Quantum Entaglement

Discussion in 'Physics' started by Wendy, Aug 30, 2015.

  1. Wendy

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  2. nsaspook

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  3. DickCappels

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    "If you think you understand quantum mechanics, you don't understand quantum mechanics." is very very widely attributed to Feynman.

    I accepted entanglement at the level of atoms years ago, and recently read of entangled crystals, albeit small crystals.
     
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  4. ElectronOrbit

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    It can be really neat. There are other applications of quantum entanglement apparently; like the transmission of electrical energy. Apparently scientist are experimenting and are already transmitting information and electrical energy across the globe. I read somewhat about it in a paper released at the 49th Annual Meeting of the Division of Plasma Physics of the American Physical Society, 2007. The paper was called The Explanation of Quantum Teleportation and Entanglement Swapping by Dr. Russell Moon. Sounds practical. Will we ever see the implications of it? Maybe next Century.
     
  5. DickCappels

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    Power transmission? It seems to be more about information. Perhaps sometime in the distant future entanglement will be useful for secure communications.
     
  6. sternpirate

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    do you have a link about the quantum transmission of energy? I would quite like to read it.
     
  7. nsaspook

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  8. BR-549

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    Dark energy is not limited to the speed of light, because it don’t shine.
     
  9. sternpirate

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    It's only a theory then but if true we will have electric cars without batteries?
     
  10. nsaspook

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    " I understand how the engines work now. It came to me in a dream. The engines don't move the ship at all. The ship stays where it is and the engines move the universe around it."
    Cubert Farnsworth[source]

    [​IMG]
     
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  11. BR-549

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    They started off saying that the majority of the mass is dark and that a larger portion of the energy is dark.

    But everytime we get an update.....those proportions increase.

    But we can’t see it or detect it. How’s come?

    Why because it’s going faster than we can detect, that’s why.

    It’s the only possible solution.

    I’m sure they’ll come up with it. As soon as the math works out.
     
  12. BR-549

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    Just think, when we do learn to “see” dark energy, that means we could watch galaxies billions of lightyears away, rotate in real time.

    This stuff could have it’s uses.
     
  13. nsaspook

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    Maybe but currently "dark matter" == "luminiferous aether" as something we have invented to explain a gap in our knowledge of physics and just like aether its said to have the correct exotic properties that make what we see work but with aether later discoveries found it was just a long trip to nowhere. Are we on the same road with 'Dark'?
     
  14. BR-549

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    Isn’t there a lot of effort and money in it? Wasn’t cern suppose to help solve this?
     
  15. BR-549

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    And does the higgs give gravity only to white matter? Or the dark too?
     
  16. nsaspook

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    CERN failed to detect WIMPS on it's last run but they are running a new experiment now called http://www.xenon1t.org/
     
  17. profbuxton

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    Dark matter, crap splatter. I think as nsaspook writes, its just a way of filling in blanks on our knowledge.Like "dark energy".
    I also believed whatever our "learned" scientists came up with but now I'm not so easily convinced.
    I even question the reliability of our measurement of universal distances and "red shift' as a measure of distance.
    How can we be sure that "red shift" is not caused by interstellar dust. Does light not slow passing through a medium? I guess we will never know tiil we use a tape measure to check it ourselves.
     
  18. Wendy

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    BR, you have a way of jumping from assumptions to absolute knowledge. The answer is no one knows, not you, not me, but people much smarter than either one of us are working on it.

    My personal feeling is there are plenty of configurations of matter that do not fall under our limited knowledge. Matter as we know it is a form of baryonic matter, but it probably isn't the only form of baryonic matter out there. There are probably configurations that are completely different besides.

    You may not believe in antimatter, but it has been confirmed and does exist. It is a good example of another form of matter, there are probably many others.

    To profbuxton, matter does slow down going through mediums, but at different rates. This is the basis of a prism. The red shift does not show this phenomenon. The spectral lines are still fixed in the measurements, so it is not a change in speed through the medium. The shift is consistent with a Doppler shift.
     
  19. BR-549

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    Wendy, surely you know that I jest about this subject. The spirals in a galaxy are helical. The stars in the helix rotate around the helix, not the galaxy. The helix rotates around the galaxy.

    Our sun is in a helix. We rotate around that helix, perpendicular to the galactic plane. So our oscillation with the galactic plane, is caused by rotation in the helix, not around the galaxy.

    Earth also has a perpendicular rotation with the plane of sun.

    When you add that 3rd perpendicular, the observed velocities make sense.

    No dark matter needed.

    But I can play. Modern science can measure real good. They can measure little chunks of charge that only live a few nanoseconds.

    So if there was dark matter, the only way to avoid detection, is if it’s movement is faster than we can detect.

    That’s what I would argue. That’s fair and legal, compared to the evidence of dark matter.

    The only evidence for dark matter.........is because a math equation doesn’t work. I didn’t say does work....I said doesn't work.

    All it really is, is an unobserved perpendicular.

    Circles, squares, sines, and ellipses account for 2 perpendiculars. Nature uses 3.

    I don’t deny they have measured “antimatter”. They mis-identified it.

    It’s regular matter. Just inverted. High voltage can do it. Thunderstorms do it.

    It’s nature’s way of confirming the parity of charge for you.
     
  20. Wendy

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    Antimatter generates very strong gamma radiation from particle annihilation. Your explanation doesn't cover that. Works for positrons too. Both have been well tested, and meet predictions very precisely. To say matter is "inverted" is a nonsense phrase.

    Thing about other forms of matter, they may not follow the rules we think of as universal. Lensing has been observed whose best candidate is dark matter. The fact we can not see them could be to a fundamentally different structure, where electrons (which is what reacts with photons and allows us to "see" atoms) are not present. Only time will tell, but it is way too soon to know anything. All we can do is ask questions and pool the data we do know. That data is very deep and expanding every year, you can not just pretend it does not exist because it is inconvenient. My own approach is to read and try to understand what I think I know and how it applies. Then be ready to adjust for new facts as they come out.
     
    Last edited: Dec 11, 2015
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