Q Factor in LC resonant circuit

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by stryzbiak, May 6, 2013.

  1. stryzbiak

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 6, 2013
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    I have a series LC circuit with a 2.8 mH torrid (did I spell that right?) and a 10.7 uF capacitor resonate at 970 Hz. I can get that frequency using a variety of combinations of L and C. What are the best values to get the best Q factor to get the best bandwith (most narrow)? Its overlapping some other frequencies.

    Thanks,

    Sid
     
  2. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    That would depend on how much power you are dumping into it. The word "torrid" basically means scorching hot. Now "torroid", on the other hand....

    What is the relationship for Q in terms of L and C?
     
  3. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    "Toroid" is even better...:D
     
  4. WBahn

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    I looked and looked and couldn't figure out what your point was. Were you really implying that "toroid" had to be capitalized?

    Then I finally noticed the subtle distinction that your spelling had three r's and mine had four!

    This double/triple vision thing is a real drag! I am SO over it -- but, alas, it has only gotten started with me.
     
  5. Ron H

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 14, 2005
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    Double vision? Whazzup?
     
  6. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    I had Lasik back in 2000 and they had to take off so much material that my corneas aren't structually sound and so they distort giving me ghost images. The fact that I now have a cataract in my left eye that renders me functionally blind in that eye isn't helping.

    It's REALLY fun when I'm trying to teach anything involving binary numbers!

    My packet magnifier has become my best friend.
     
  7. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    The best values for L and C for the best Q factor are those with high Q. In other words, if you want a high Q LC circuit, you have to use high Q components. Other than that, it depends on the circuit topology. For a parallel LC, if my memory serves, the Q is 1/R*sqrt(L/C). But that is only for a parallel circuit. You sould calculate Q for your circuit.

    The equation I gave is from a 20 year old memory. Treat is as an example, and calcuate the Q for yourself.
     
  8. stryzbiak

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 6, 2013
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    I appreciate the help.
     
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