Pulsed DC signal and powerline transformers

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Zip, Jun 16, 2013.

  1. Zip

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 5, 2013
    2
    0
    How can you send a pulsed(1 billion pulses per second) DC current over a AC transformer without saturating the core?

    The signal frequency is 60Hz/50hz.
    The strength of the signal is 1-10uW
    The pulse rate is 1 billion pulses per second.
     
  2. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
    677
    85

    If the pulse rate is 1billion per second,then the signal frequency is 1GHz,not 50/60 Hz.

    The signal may have a DC reference level,so that one 1/2 cycle returns to a set DC level,rather than being symmetrically distributed about zero volts,but it is effectively an UHF AC signal.

    The DC component is present for such a short time compared to that which it takes for the transformer magnetic field to respond,that there could be no saturation effect.

    In any case,for many other reasons,a powerline transformer will not operate at 1GHz,so you will not be able to do what you are attempting.
     
  3. Zip

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 5, 2013
    2
    0
    So if I send a 500Khz-1Mhz modulated "pulsed" DC current over a transformer what would happen to it?

    So if you have a DC current that returns to 0 volts before the magnetic field responds won't saturate the core?
     
  4. vk6zgo

    Active Member

    Jul 21, 2012
    677
    85
    Even at these lower frequencies,a transformer designed for 50Hz will not
    operate as a transformer----rather,it will look like a very large inductor.

    Any coupling between primary & secondary will be due to capacitance,or some magnetic coupling outside the core.

    A pulsed signal is effectively AC.
    Even if the transformer could work,you would lose any DC component.

    Power authorities do feed high audio & above control tones through their networks,but they need to use special circuitry to jump from primary to secondary of a power transformer.

    I suggest you Google for "Electricity System control tones",or some similar term.
     
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