Pulsar art transfer

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by capnray, Oct 21, 2011.

  1. capnray

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 3, 2010
    59
    2
    Anyone with experince here? I'm looking at a HP LaserJet Pro P1102 to generate the artwork. It seems "cost effective" and if it indeed can generate 1200 dpi, the wife says OK.
     
  2. gootee

    Senior Member

    Apr 24, 2007
    447
    50
    Small world. I live in Jasper.

    What does "pulsar" refer to, here?

    I have used laserjet output and heat/pressure to transfer toner to copper, as etch-resist, for making circuit boards, and to the fiberglass "component sides" of pcbs, and to other metals and plastics for front panel artwork.

    What are you trying to accomplish?

    Cheers,

    Tom
     
  3. capnray

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 3, 2010
    59
    2
    Yes, small world.

    I'm trying the same thing. Pulsar makes a paper that will release all of the toner to the PCB. Do you use a special paper for the transfer process?
     
  4. gootee

    Senior Member

    Apr 24, 2007
    447
    50
    Yes, the paper was THE key to making the whole process work well.

    I eventually found a glossy inkjet paper, at Staples, that worked very well, in my old LaserJet III and IV printers. That was five to ten years ago and I haven't made a board for at least two or three years. Back then, they kept changing the name and model number of the paper and I don't know if it's still available, there, any more.

    I suggest going to the Homebrew_PCBs discussion group, at yahoogroups.com, where someone probably has kept track of the best commonly-available paper type. Glossy magazine paper is also said to work very well, although I never tried it.

    One of my main motivations, back then, was trying to have all of the supplies be available almost anywhere there was civilization (except maybe for the copper-clad FR4 blank boards). I documented it all fairly-thoroughly, at http://www.fullnet.com./~tomg/gooteepc.htm . You will like the etchant for which I have posted the recipe. No more waiting for chemicals to arrive in the mail.

    Eventually, for production boards, I just started using 4pcb.com.

    If there's any other information I could provide that might be helpful, don't hesitate to ask.

    Cheers,

    Tom Gootee
     
  5. HarveyH42

    Active Member

    Jul 22, 2007
    425
    5
    The Pulsar paper is great. I fooled around with every paper suggest on the web, tried various cloths iron settings, and techniques, for about a month. Only got two, barely usable boards, out of all the frustrating work. Bought a laminator, and a pack of the Pulsar paper, and seldom a reject board since. Cuts the time down considerably too, takes literally seconds to release under water, just hold it under the tap. It releases cleanly, no pulp to rub and scrub, no touch ups with a marker. Just my choice, I don't enjoy making PCBs, just using them.

    A lot of people have success with a clothes iron, and magazine paper. Make it sounds so easy, and foolproof. I'm a fool, and spend the extra 50 cents to make a board, since I didn't seem to have the knack for doing it on the cheap. The savings in my free time, an much less aggravation, makes it well worth it to me. Hate drilling dozens of holes, too. Someday, I'm going buy/build a CNC drilling machine!
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,766
    2,536
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