protoboard

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by matty204359, May 10, 2011.

  1. matty204359

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 6, 2011
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    3
    I need to whip up a small circuit and was going to buy some small protoboards from a suppler in my region. I'm faced with a dilemma on my purchase. they stock 2 different kinds but give no comparison between the two

    here are the links
    Heliotype
    EPOXY


    Does any body know of any difference in regards to functionality, safety or usage between the two types Heliotype and EPOXY. I noticed the color difference and price difference so no need to mention those.
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
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    I've used both. The green one is more modern, and I think it's fiberglass. The brown one is a material that I can't think of the name right now, but they work the same for me. I wouldn't pay any attention to the difference. When this response bumps the thread to the top, somebody else might remember the material that the brown boards are made of.

    In the low frequency, low voltage world I live in, there is no difference.
     
  3. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,783
    944
    It is a paper/epoxy based "Garolite". There are many types with different substrates and epoxy mixtures. The green fiberglass one is also a Garolite subtype. I'm sure there are other brand names than Garolite, but google Garolite and see what you get. IF you are interested.
     
  4. matty204359

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 6, 2011
    105
    3
    So I should go for the cheaper one since I'm not made of money?
     
  5. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
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    31
    The type you use is a personal preference. The fiberglass/epoxy type is easier to cut to size as the other type is more brittle and doesn't cut well.

    Capacitance between pads and other external factors are negligible. If you are making a prototype, your choice of board is irrelevant. However, with RF circuits, some stages should be shielded from other stages for obvious reasons. You should encase your RF project in a metal enclosure if possible. Otherwise plastic would be fine.
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2011
  6. matty204359

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 6, 2011
    105
    3
    I assume I would need to use a small Dremel cutoff wheel to cut these boards.
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Thank you, radiohead. I have not cut a green board yet, but I can attest to the fact that the brown boards do throw chips when you hacksaw them with the finest teeth you can get (about 24 tpi). That's why I cut brown boards through the holes of the row I won't need and finish them on the grinder.

    I will soon find out because I only have about 2 projects worth of brown board left.
     
  8. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
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    You can use a hack saw, band saw, coping saw, or even trim a piece with lineman's pliers. If you file or sand the fiberglass type, I highly recommend you use a filter mask to protect your lungs from the fine fiberglass particulates (the dust)
     
  9. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    matty: Can you jump over into Detroit? In the US there is a company called "Radio Shack" that still sells a limited number of component parts. They have boards similar to the "brown" board style. You can check which store has what parts online.

    Despite some drawbacks I still prefer these boards for my breadboards, and while these boards are designed for thru hole devices they can be useful for surface mount parts too. (I actually prefer to work in surface mount parts.)

    I agree with the rough cut then sand edge method of cutting. It will just look nicer. However, I usually use a whole board in my work.

    Vector makes some first class prototyping boards but they are quite expensive.
     
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
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    Yes, surface mount parts will work on these boards. It looks so slick to build a 100ma battery charger in half a square inch because the caps are surface mount tantalums and nobody can see the back of the board.

    ps, love the pronunciation of your city. Some Noo Yawkers actually sound like that.
     
  11. radiohead

    Active Member

    May 28, 2009
    474
    31
    See attached for some interesting ideas for a battery charger. A good starting point.
     
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