protective coating for winding coils? product?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ElectromagnetNewbee, Sep 18, 2014.

  1. ElectromagnetNewbee

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 13, 2014
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    im trying to purchase a product (not sure of the name) but it is used to protect copper coils and stop them from unraveling? I think it my be called 'resin' or 'epoxy' or 'acrylic'? i need a cheap product to coat my copper coils after i wind them cause they always seem to unwind.

    what is this product that i need?
     
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    It is kinda hard to know what you need. Can't you just tie the coil ends to terminals on the bobbin on which you wind the coil? Various motor and transformer manufacturers us a "varnish" to prevent uncoiling and add insulation. As a hobbyist, have you considered a hot melt adhesive? I have also used a polyester "transformer tape" to keep the coils intact, particularly on toroids.

    John
     
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  3. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    With the size wires you have been using, a piece of string or some masking tape or duct tape would work.
     
  4. bwilliams60

    Active Member

    Nov 18, 2012
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    I'm not sure what size wire you are winding but having come from the alternator and starter rebuilding industry, I can tell you there are a few good choices out there for you. We used an insulating varnish on most of our stuff and you can buy the cheaper varnish and all you do is make your coil in the form you want, and then hand dip it into a pail and let it air dry. The second choice is to get actual motor varnish and the procedure is somewhat the same, but then you put it into an oven and bake it as per manufacturers recommendations. As # 12 says, you can also use string or field coil tape and then varnish them as well. If you have someone in your area that rebuilds electric motors, they would be the people to talk to. Cheers
     
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  5. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    Back in the dark ages, we used a material called Q-dope. Let me look n see if it's still available (other than from my local alchemist)
     
  6. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    Well...I'll be dipped in shellac! They still make it!
    http://www.hmcelectronics.com/product/GC-Electronics/10-3702
     
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  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    If stuck getting winding varnish, there is also Glyptal, available from most Electrical contractor suppliers.
    Max.
     
  8. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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    Glyptal is great for preventing high voltage arcs and such, but it doesn't have much mechanical holding power at all.
     
  9. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
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    5 minute epoxy.......
     
  10. Sensacell

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 19, 2012
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    clear fingernail polish is very handy.
     
  11. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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  12. KL7AJ

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 4, 2008
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  13. telefunkinu476

    New Member

    Sep 10, 2014
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    I've used polyurethane from a rattle can !
     
  14. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    The cheap approach is fiberglass resin you can buy for doing body work on your car. Not Bondo, the clear, pourable stuff.

    Good stuff - potting resin - is much more expensive but has superior properties of heat conduction and much lower coefficient of thermal expansion. In other words, it's way better than cheap resin if you have heat issues.
     
  15. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    there is no information on whether these are magnet coils or rf coils. if rf coils, the stuff will have to be low loss, like the old time "Q" dope whitch was styreme disolved in carbon tetrachloride. if a magnet coil, it will have to have strength, but rf losses wont be a problem.
     
  16. takao21203

    Distinguished Member

    Apr 28, 2012
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    Electrical tape does the job, as a layer, or just a small strip. The glue is kind of sticky but does not bond too strong, can be disattached if need be.

    These tapes are mostly plain PVC and thick enough for 400VAC (tough I'd rather use a few layers for that).

    I think approved electrical tape has a defined voltage it must withstand at least 1000V or so, the actual voltage where arcing will occur easily will be higher than that.

    For a transformer or coil that gets hot and has high voltage too, you need a special tape, some are made from the same material as TFT flex PCBs, others are similar to PVC electrical tape.

    A thick PVC foil is a good insulator if it has no defects such as thin spots or even small holes.

    You can test for PVC by burning just a tiny bit of the tape, it will smell very characteristic, you'll just know that smell from PVC. For a commercial product you need special tape which is conditioned so it does not ignite (PVC does not easily but it can burn).

    Makes me think of parts from old televisions some very nasty they'd burn a long time, and tiny black particles floating in the air...
     
  17. ElectromagnetNewbee

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 13, 2014
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    what is a high voltage arc? as you say.
     
  18. ElectromagnetNewbee

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 13, 2014
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    i LOVE ancient alchemy. I make Ormus, white atomic gold. using dead sea salt. massive earth minerals you cant get elsewhere. it is known as a spirit drug. it changes the body frequency to a more healthy one. Moses gave it to the isrealites in the bible, its kept them healthy for the long duration via the dessert supposebly?
     
  19. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    What is high voltage arc??? :eek:

    It's the best way to get killed while playing with electricity.
    High voltage arc is sometimes known as lightening, flash-over, or static electricity. Two of those can kill you. When playing with inductors, it is a sort of short between windings, but it only happens in little bursts while current jumps through the air...most of the time.
     
  20. ISB123

    Well-Known Member

    May 21, 2014
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    This:

    [​IMG]
     
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