Project: Digitally selectable voltage voltage regulator using LM317

Discussion in 'The Completed Projects Collection' started by dileepchacko, May 21, 2008.

  1. dileepchacko

    Thread Starter Active Member

    May 13, 2008
    102
    1
    Here a simple digitally selectable voltage voltage regulator using LM317
    It can provide maximum 1500mA. Diode D1 and D2 is for protection from short circuit. Vs2,Vs3,Vs4,Vs5 is jest for simulation purpose. You can connect the 4 input to an TTL logic. Even you can change the resistor value and get 16 combination of voltages.


    Design Equation


    Vout= 1.25*(1+R2/R1)+Iadj*R2


    where Vout= Output voltage from voltage regulator
    R2= Equivalent resistance of R6,R7,R8 and R9 (parallel combination)
    R1= 120Ohm
    Iadj=50uA
     
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  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Think binary as well as digital, if R2 = 1K, R3 = 2K, R4 = 4K, and R5 = 8K.

    Or maybe R2 = 125, R3 = 250, R4 = 500, and R5 = 1K.

    Or some variation thereof. The advantage is a wider range, and just as controllable.
     
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  3. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    Bill is correct, as usual. With all four collector resistors the same value, an input of 0101 will yield the same output as 1010 or 1001.
     
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  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I was thinking of this circuit while driving, 4 bits could be useful, but 8 should be better. If you have a 25V max output you should be able to get within .1V, which is usually good enough for a lot of projects. 8 bits is a standard byte in the computer world.

    I'm not sure how linear the output would be though, I may graph it just to see. I wouldn't use transistors myself, something like a 4051 CMOS would be more likely if the current requirements were in spec (or close).
     
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  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    The posted circuit is extremely similar to an entry on page 21 in National Semiconductor's datasheet for the LM117/LM217/LM317.

    Link to datasheet on National's site: http://www.national.com/ds.cgi/LM/LM117.pdf
    See the attached excerpt.
     
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  6. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
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    Steve Ciracica had a similar article about this about 25 years ago. The purpose was to select programming voltages for a universal EPROM programmer.

    It's a handy technique for selecting output voltage from a homemade bench PS.
     
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  7. gogo2520

    New Member

    Sep 16, 2008
    3
    1
    Hello
    I made a made one sort of like that, I found the project at http://members.shaw.ca/roma/ about three years ago. If I remember right the transistors were backwards on the PCB but that was easy to fix. I like the push button selector. I had fun making it and still use it today
    Have fun
    gogo
     
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  8. italo

    New Member

    Nov 20, 2005
    205
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    You sure 25v 4051 is only good to 20v. Iguess it will work once.
     
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  9. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    You're right, just looked up the spec sheet of the CD4051, while you could use it in binary mode it would use more resistors and only be 3 bit.
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2009
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  10. tirnasjimmy

    New Member

    Jul 28, 2011
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    The statement "R2 is the equivalent resistance of R6,R7,R8 & R9 in parallel" should read " R2 is the equivalent resistence of R2,R3,R4 & R5 in parallel."

    Also R2 is used twice. once, presumably, as the resistor in the datasheet formula for the LM317 and again as one of the 4 switchable resistors.

    Values of resistors R6 to R9 are irrelevant as long as they are big enough to protect the BJT base-emitter junction from current overload and small enough to allow the BJTs to saturate.
     
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