Programming help Hitachi VFD

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by majohnson, Jan 13, 2013.

  1. majohnson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2013
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    I've installed a VFD to run my mill of 110 single phase. Currently the motor is 1hp 220v 3phase. I'm only after basic operations such as speed control, forward, reverse, and braking. I'm fine with the VFD braking and don't need to use an external resistor.

    I'm usually good with electrical, I did a lot electrical repairs as an automotive tech. I'm will to pay or trade for the help.
     
  2. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    give us your VFD model, and clarify what your doing. You want to run what motor off of what supply?
     
  3. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
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    so you are probably looking to use external potentiometer to set the speed and
    use either start, stop buttons with selector switch for forward/reverse or
    use of three buttons (forward, stop, reverse). to provide you with connection diagram and parameter settings we would at very least need to know exact part number of the drive. i am guessing it is the WJ200 series product:

    http://www.hitachi-america.us/ice/i...e_speed_drives/wj200/?WT.ac=pro_smm_pro_wj200
     
  4. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    i believe you'll need to derate the motor HP by half since you're only to be able to supply 110V 3 phase (half the rated voltage). Is there no way to access 220V single phase?
     
  5. majohnson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2013
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    Sorry I thought I had included the VFD info.
    Hitachi wj200 007mf ver 2.0 manual number NT3261X

    The manuel isn't the best, they refer to chapters of which there are none, along with others items.

    I can't find anything about derating in the book. In researching before I purchase the VFD, it was my under standing that the key pad provided speed control, along with direction change. Additional it would also provide braking when using stop function, if you required additional braking, an external resistor could be installed in the input circuits.

    This VFD model will only function with 110 input voltage. I had originally purchased a phase converter and was going to install 220v. After reading about the VFD, there was to less performance loss and it would give me speed control without changing belt positions since I have an older step pulley model Bridgeport model.
     
  6. majohnson

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 12, 2013
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    While Hitachi manual's leave some to be desired, their customer support is first rate. The rep took me through each and every setting I needed and then had me go through the steps to confirm things worked as I wanted. There was no since of hurry on his part, it was all about making sure I was happy with the unit.
     
  7. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I googled your motor. I was very surprised when I saw specs claiming 110/120V input and 220/240V output. I have never seen a drive that steps voltage up above input level. I set into reading the manual, looking to see if it had an onboard transformer. What I found, the description of operation, sounded just like an ordinary drive:
    (page 33 of 475)
    No mention of a transformer, neither does the figure depict one.

    So I thought maybe it employs some kind of buck boost method, and found nothing promising about that. Here's what I did find:
    page 91/475:
    page 103/475:
    I don't think you're going to get 3 phase 220V out of this thing. I think it's going to be 3 phase 110V, which is half of what your motor is made for. I think you'll have to derate it. I have no idea why they claim 220V output with 110V input.
     
  8. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
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    i see no reason to resort to derating, 200-240VAC is quite common.

    WJ200 is a standard drive with a very decent documentation. i don't see anything more in manuals from other manufacturers. even quick guide is rather suficient and easy to follow:
    http://www.hitachi-america.us/supportingdocs/forbus/inverters/Support/NT3251X.pdf
    but if this is not enough, there is a detailed manual as well.

    if you know what you do, you can use front panel on the VFD to control it but i think it will be much more user friendly to bring out needed functions (start/stop, direction and speed). i prefer to keep this out of sight so that users don't inadvertently alter any drive parameters.
     
  9. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    I saw nowhere in the manual for OP's drive that it's ok to apply 200-240V to the input. I clearly states that the input is 100-120V, and the output is 200-240V. Later in the manual it contradicts this and says that it cannot output more than input.
    This manual does not address the M model, which is what OP has. Please see the manual in my previous link. His drive is specified for only 100-110V input.
    M=Single-phase 100V class
    [​IMG]
     
  10. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
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    thank you for following up, i did get wrong manual
     
  11. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    now that you've seen the manual, do you have any ideas? I know you've been at this stuff a lot longer than me. Have you ever seen a drive spec'd like this? I haven't. Would you put 220V on the input? If you put 110 on the input, would you expect it to output 3ph 220V or 3ph 110V? If it output 3ph 110V, would you need to derate the motor?
     
  12. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
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    no i would not put 220V on the input, i would follow the manufacturers recommendation and use 120V supply.

    boosting voltage is not a problem (and even regulating if needed), there is plenty of drives that do that. Allen Bradley 22A-V4P5N104 is another 1HP drive with 120V single phase in and 230V 3-phase out. if you look at the nameplate you will notice that output current is significantly lower than input current.

    here is related video using similar drive (comparable 1HP unit from Temco is CFW100040SAZ):
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SOxNjsuUrZA
     
  13. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
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    What about the sections of the manual I quoted in post #7, saying "the output voltage cannot be greater than the input voltage" and "the drive cannot boost voltage"?

    I think that this drive is probably based on (a modified version of) the 240V model and so uses the same output hardware as the larger 240 drives, so they just kept the higher rating. In the same way the V8 and V6 versions of the same pickup truck might have the same transmission and therefore both rated for "400HP, 450FT*LBS torque" even though only one is actually capable of such.

    Either that, or those sections of the manual stating "the output voltage cannot be greater than the input voltage" and "the drive cannot boost voltage" applied to the 240V input models, and Hitachi forgot to delete them when making the 120V model.

    Or, there's something I still don't get.
     
  14. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
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    page 91 talks about volts per herts presets. this allows characterizing drive for variable torque control, it does not set motor output voltage. note that these settigns can be cranked up to 800V. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variable-frequency_drive

    page 103 describes AVR setup. Hitachi should be answering this one. i think it might just be poorly worded translation. they probably wanted to say that drive can attempt to regulate output voltage to selected preset (200/215/220/230/240V), provided that input voltage remains within spec (100-120V).
     
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