Programming a chip

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by FFtravism, Mar 12, 2009.

  1. FFtravism

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 21, 2008
    30
    0
    I am working for the first time on programming a chip (PIC16F88). I have a K149-BC pic programmer. Link. I hooked it up and it says it reads in a 3FFF and I tell it to program just a small code and when I read it back in it's not truly programed. What am I doing wrong or did I just get a crappy programmer?
    Thanks
    Travis
     
  2. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,634
    2,342
    Hello,

    What do the instructions say about external powersupply and jumper settings ?

    Greetings,
    Bertus
     
  3. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
    6,357
    718
    Other than checking power/jumpers as already suggested. Make sure you are using the USB or Serial Port as set up in the programming software. Get the latest software and firmware for the programmer if it isn't new. Does the software say it is communicating?

    If it is plugged into USB, is it attached to a powered hub, or to a standard hub? The ICD2, for example, needs to be plugged into a powered USB hub or other power for complete functionality.

    Of the programmers I have, the most often used is the PicKit 2. Oddly, it's the cheapest one too. Many companies build/sell it, some as kits for under $30.
     
  4. AlexR

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2008
    735
    54
    It sounds as if your PC is not talking to the programmer.

    What interface are you using, serial or USB.

    If USB, have you installed the serial to USB driver software that comes with the programmer. Also is the programmer software pointing to the correct com port. You will need to look in the Windows hardware/device manager to see which com port has been assigned to the programmer USB connection.
     
  5. FFtravism

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 21, 2008
    30
    0
    I am using USB. my computer detected the drivers it needed and I am using the programming software that come with it. The jumper is on USB and the other jumper i don't know what it is used for. I checked the com port and it's com 5 and the software says it sees the programmer. The power light it on and when its reading from the chip the program light comes on. This is pluged right in to my USB on the motherboard.

    thanks
    Travis
     
  6. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
    6,357
    718
    The second jumper may select between USB powered and external power supply. Can't say for sure. Do you have a voltmeter to check what VPP goes to while programming?
     
  7. FFtravism

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 21, 2008
    30
    0
    I sure do. I will test it tomorrow when I get home from work.
     
  8. FFtravism

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 21, 2008
    30
    0
    I checked VPP on pin 4 and it went up to .23 volts while trying to program.

    travis
     
  9. leftyretro

    Active Member

    Nov 25, 2008
    394
    2
    That doesn't sound like enough voltage to program a chip does it. ;)

    Lefty
     
  10. thatoneguy

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2009
    6,357
    718
    Vpp needs to go over 10V while programming. The "other jumper" may be power selection. Is there a power adapater jack on the side of it?

    Is this unit new enough to return it? If that is an option, follow that route. Then shop around for a PicKit 2 from any manufacturer.

    No offense, but I've seen several people entirely turned away from uCs from DIY or "low cost" programmer kits. One spent two weeks trying to get his to work, and then gave up, ENTIRELY, on uCs! He thought that if simply getting the programmer that "works for everybody else" working was so difficult, he would never be able to actually build a uC operated circuit. Trying to save $15 cost him a lot more.

    By the same token, if you build a programmer and it works great, and can program multiple chips at a fraction of the cost of an "Industrial" programmer, then go for it! There are too many "EZ Programmers" for parallel and serial and USB out there that are very picky about the systems they will work with. Some systems do not limit USB current, others do. Some parallel ports allow higher current draw than specs as well, same for serial. The safest method is to get an externally powered one, or a known good production one, as the cost is the price of 1 pic + breadboard more.
     
  11. FFtravism

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 21, 2008
    30
    0
    Ok now I feel kind of stupid. But this is my first time programming a chip. I was looking at the diagram where to put my chip that the program showed and it never said where the handle on the 3m zif socket was. So I had it at the wrong end of the socket. I moved it and it's now programing just fine. Thank you all.
    Travis
     
Loading...