problem with borland c++5.5

Discussion in 'Programmer's Corner' started by dmccormick84, Mar 3, 2010.

  1. dmccormick84

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2010
    11
    1
    Just downloaded the Borland c++ 5.5 compiler (FREE!) Typed in the usual 'Hello,world' program... it produced an error message 'unable to create turboc.$ln ' What IS 'turboc.$ln' ? Thanks for any help... Ohh... it did create an .obj file but I have no idea how to compile that either. Yes, I am kinda slow after ten years away from programming.:eek:
     
  2. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    Sorry, I can't help with the original question. A decade or so ago I started using the MinGW compiler in preference to the Borland compiler and I recommend it. Your knowledge of the compiler options and other tools will be portable to other platforms. I doubt the Borland compiler is supported on anything other than Windows.
     
  3. dmccormick84

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2010
    11
    1
    Thanks for a quick reply, someonesdad... I'll give the minGW a try. I also tried lcc-win32 compiler and it complained about not finding some of the .h files! (but found others in the include directory!) Maybe I'll just take up basket weaving or something, eh?:confused:
     
  4. dmccormick84

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2010
    11
    1
    Thanks again, somonesdad... minGW works quite well... :)
     
  5. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    I was a bit brief, so here's an explanation for others. Many people like to use the GNU compiler toolchain and it is available on lots of platforms. For people convicted to do time on Windows machines, for a long time the only choice was to buy a commercial compiler or use the cygwin compiler. cygwin is fine for personal use, but if you wanted to distribute an application, you were looking at large licensing fees from RedHat Software (on the order of $10k if I remember right).

    Then a group of people put together the MinGW (Minimalist GNU for Windows) package. It is free without the licensing restrictions of cygwin.

    This gives you the GNU gcc/g++ compilers (along with Java, FORTRAN, and Pascal) and the associated tools. As I mentioned in my previous post, learning the GNU toolchain is worthwhile because it's used lots of places.
     
  6. dmccormick84

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 3, 2010
    11
    1
    For a long time I did not realize that the platform made a difference in programming in C. My first REAL computer was an Amiga 2000 back in the early '80s. It used the Motorola 68000 chip rather than an 8xxx Intel chip. Hey, it was a GREAT platform! Commodore just dropped the ball!:mad:
     
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