Problem soldering metal wires.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by zazas321, Dec 8, 2015.

  1. zazas321

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 29, 2015
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    Hello. I am really having difficulties whenever i have to soldier 2 wires together, because the soldering metal just wont stick to a wire, it just drop down like a water drop :/ Im not sure if i have very bad soldering iron, or maybe everyone has the same problem??
     
  2. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    What kind of wire? (steel, copper, aluminum) not all metals will take solder. The wire must be clean and shiny and free from oils and other contamination. The wire must be heated to let the solder flow on it, don't just melt the solder and let it drip on the wire. What kind of solder? does it have a flux core? Let us know what you have..
     
  3. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Make sure the wire is clean and use flux. The wires should also provide some sort of mechanical support. Google western union splice.
     
  4. zazas321

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 29, 2015
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    http://imgur.com/a/dneuS
    I guess the wire is copper, and the soldering metal says cored, so i guess its flux cored but im not sure tho...And im using 30W old soldering gun
     
  5. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Are you heating the wire (not the solder) and then applying the solder to the wire (not the iron)?
     
  6. zazas321

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 29, 2015
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    yeah i touch the wire with soldering gun and then touch the same place with metal...:( Maybe i need some more flux to add on wire.
     
  7. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    Apply the solder to the wire away from the soldering gun.
     
  8. Dodgydave

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 22, 2012
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    Put solder on the iron and let it melt then put the iron under the wire and touch it with the soldering iron and keep feeding the solder while moving the iron along the wire, you're better with 60/40 flux solder 18/22swg. If the wire doesn't tin it may be coated.
     
  9. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    The tip of the iron must be clean also, it cannot transfer heat to the wire if the tip is dirty. One easy way to clean the tip is to get it hot and wipe it across a wet sponge..
     
  10. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    Start by heating up your soldering iron. It may take a while, so be patient (once you’ve soldered a few times, you’ll know how long to wait.)

    While you wait (or before), prepare the joint. It should be clean and down to bare metal. There should be good mechanical contact between the components. Wires should be stripped and twisted tightly together.

    Touch a bit of solder to the tip. It should melt immediately. Then, with a damp sponge or rag, wipe the tip. It should look shiny and wet.

    Hold the tip against the joint to heat it up. My iron takes 2-3 seconds.

    Then, apply solder – AWAY FROM THE TIP. In the case of twisted wires or a solder tab, on the opposite side of where you’re going to apply the older is a good location. As suggested. The hot metal of the joint should melt the solder, and draw it into the joint.

    Remove the tip. Don’t let the joint get disturbed and move. The solder should harden with a shiny surface.

    Then congratulate yourself on making a good solder joint.
     
  11. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    In electronic work; most wires are tin plated so soldering is pretty easy with mild flux usually found in cored solder.

    You can buy special cored solder with more active flux for things like aluminium or stainless steel - but they're more expensive.

    A couple of fluxes I keep to hand, include the Fluxite (brown paste) flux which is usually good enough for regular steel as long as it isn't rusty. A more aggressive flux was obtained from the plumber's supply yard - the had "mild" and "active"; I bought the stronger one, it just about does for soldering stainless with regular solder.

    For things like Bowden cables on motorcycles; I found a can of brick staining acid - its so strong, it takes the iron plating off regular electronics work irons.
     
  12. bwilliams60

    Active Member

    Nov 18, 2012
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    Just curious, is that solid core copper wire? Or stranded core? Hard to tell by the picture.
     
  13. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    It looks stranded to me; with some solder on it here and there...

    Every time I see a picture like that, I wonder why they're giving us pictures of their fingers...
     
  14. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Pin the wire down so it doesn't struggle.

    Tin the wire with the tip of the iron over it and feed the cored solder in at the wire end, the solder and flux will hang under the soldering tip by surface tension. That way the flux gets onto the wire to hold back oxidation, and the solder gets good contact to the wire so it gets hot and allows the solder to alloy to it.
     
  15. zazas321

    Thread Starter Member

    Nov 29, 2015
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    Okay thanks for all the help. Il tryy
     
  16. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    And if that doesn't work:
    From the photo it might not be copper. Is it just this particular kind of wire that you are having trouble with, or do you frequently have this problem?
     
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