Problem Please help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by needs, Apr 11, 2010.

  1. needs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 30, 2010
    16
    0
    what is output compliance of a circuit? is there any equation to find it?

    thanks.
     
  2. atferrari

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 6, 2004
    2,648
    764
    The way to find out:

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    Ample subjects are better approached that way. Details and specific points deserve to come here and ask. Believe me. It generally works like that.
     
  3. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
    9,030
    214
    We are going to need more information. Do you have an example of a circuit that you need to analyze for output compliance?

    hgmjr
     
  4. awright

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 5, 2006
    84
    7
    I believe one definition of compliance refers to the ability of the amplifier to supply the voltage necessary to drive the load to the desired signal level. The usage I am most familiar with refers to the capability of a current source to provide enough voltage to drive the desired current through a variable resistance load.

    Take, for example, a 10 ma. constant current source. If it is loaded with a 300 ohm resistance and the constant current source requires, say, 2 volts across it to maintain the desired output current, the supply voltage would have to be at least 5 volts (2 volts across the current source and 3 volt across the 300 ohm load).

    If the load resistance increased to 1000 ohms, the required supply voltage would have to be 12 volts (2 volts across the current source and 10 volts across the 1000 ohm load). If the supply voltage was only 5 volts, the circuit would not have adequate COMPLIANCE to drive the 1000 ohm load.

    Compliance is a critical factor in current loop signal transmission circuits in which the receiver may have an input resistance arbitrarily chosen by the designer without adequate consideration of the compliance of the transmitter.

    This is not a rigorous definition - it is merely the usage that I am familiar with. This would refer to voltage compliance. I do not know if compliance is used to refer to current capability.

    awright
     
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