Power Supply to Arduino

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by careless_monkey, Jan 12, 2011.

  1. careless_monkey

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 11, 2011
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    I have my laptop's power adapter that might be able to fit the input power to my Arduino board. The output is 10.6V and 1.32A. Is it safe to do or should I use a 9V battery instead. I don't have any clip on for the battery right now and that's why I was looking at other options.
    Thanks!
     
  2. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    The recommended voltage for supplying the Arduino Uno/Mega is 7-12V So 10.6 volt is in the range and should work fine. Batteries is a pain to work with. As they will be depleted then you most not want them to be ;) Just get the polarity correct
    from your laptop's power adapter.
     
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  3. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    You can use the 10.6 power supply provided the power plug is wired so that the center of the plug is positive and the outer sleeve is negative.

    hgmjr
     
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  4. careless_monkey

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 11, 2011
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    Sorry for being so stupid. But how do I check for the polarity?
    I have almost the same adapter in this picture.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    If your power has simlar marking you should be safe. This marking is showing the inner and outer sleeve polarity. If not you can find any such marking you will need a volt meter to measure
     
  6. demigod

    New Member

    Oct 27, 2010
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    I just checked and mine is the other way around. How do I use this power supply to my Arduino then?
     
  7. careless_monkey

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 11, 2011
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    ^^ same as demigod.
    Is it still possible to use it?
     
  8. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    The power supply pictured in post #4 has the correct polarity but it looks from the picture like it has a 19VDC output if I read the label correctly.

    hgmjr
     
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  9. careless_monkey

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 11, 2011
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    It's a picture that I found on the internet to give the idea of what I was talking about. I checked what I have and the polarity on mine is switched.
    Sorry for the confusion. :(
     
  10. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    You may get one of those. You will then have to cut your cable and swap the polarity. If you are unsure on how to this. You should ask some that is more experienced to help you out. As it may not be so simple as it sounds. Or ask around to see if some of friends have something lying around that you can use.
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. careless_monkey

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 11, 2011
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    Thanks for your patience and help. I'll ask my lab tech to help me out.

    Just out of curiosity, what would happen if I do plug it the power supply into the Arduino?
     
  12. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    You will have an expensive hood ornament.

    hgmjr
     
  13. hgmjr

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    Jan 28, 2005
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    Make sure that once you change the polarity on the cable, that you mark through the original indication on the power supply. This will prevent someone from mistakenly assuming that the power supply is still negative inner and positive outer.

    hgmjr
     
  14. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    Nah nothing much would have happened. Since at least the Arduino Uno/Mega is protected by a diode against such dumbness. At least as long as the protection diode works as it should. But bottom line. Do not test it. Or else you may end up with expensive and not so good paper weight.
     
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  15. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    You're right. The diode would safeguard the board from potential damage to the components on the board.

    I agree that this not a good thing to try however.

    hgmjr
     
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  16. careless_monkey

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 11, 2011
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    Thanks for the replies. Luckily my power supply to my external HDD fits and works just fine. :)
     
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