Power Factor Unit for Domestic Use

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by majsyd2010, Mar 9, 2011.

  1. majsyd2010

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 29, 2010
    61
    1
    G'day Guys ...

    I hope all of us doing great and are in best shape that we could be,

    Today, I was wondering if anyone of us thought of a domestic use Power factor Unit ... Does it work??? Is it worth to build one...?? Any thoughts or advice or suggestions

    I am not sure of Electricity bills in your part of land, but down under it is getting expensive and expensive...

    Cheers,

    MajSyd2010
     
  2. blueroomelectronics

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 22, 2007
    1,758
    98
    Are you sure you're being charged for PF losses on your domestic energy bill?
     
  3. JDT

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 12, 2009
    658
    85
    Do you mean a power factor correction unit - adding capacitance to get the PF as close to 1 as possible?

    Domestic electricity meters only measure kWh so the PF will not effect your bill. So not worth it.

    PS: Been to Sydney twice and I love it! And I've done the bridge climb!
     
  4. Jaguarjoe

    Active Member

    Apr 7, 2010
    770
    90
  5. debe

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2010
    946
    184
    Hi majsyd, Checkout the editorial in this months Siliconchip magazine. What i think you are looking at is a scam. There was artical on TV here recently also. The claims were if you plug this device into the a power point it will reduce your power bill by up to 30%. Doesnt work, all there is in the unit is a couple of capacitors a couple or resistors & a LED. Keep your money. The de bunking of this product was in an article of Siliconchip back in Nov 2007 & again in May2008.
     
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2011
  6. majsyd2010

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 29, 2010
    61
    1
    What do you mean by PF losses on your domestic

     
  7. majsyd2010

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 29, 2010
    61
    1
    I did read that article but not sure of scam, I was more thinking to spend money and built it and see if it works ... I dont know yet that is why need your advise ..



     
  8. blueroomelectronics

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 22, 2007
    1,758
    98
    You aren't charged for power factor at your home.
     
  9. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,778
    932
    power factor correction CAN increase the efficiency of a motor. Large motors(like one in central cooling and heating systems) can benefit from PF correction, when applied only to that device. Power factor levels in a household change everytime a different number of devices are powered on or off. No way to correct for that ever changing situation(cheaply).

    Placing power factor correction on a single appliance CAN save you the money lost to its inefficiency. Newer motors are already very well balanced for this, but older motors could benefit from it.

    It might save you $20-40 dollars on electric cost for running that motor during the course of a year or so.
     
  10. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    you don't apply pf correction to a device. You can't change the devices inherant characteristics with pf correction. Power Factor correction offsets those characteristics so that the supply 'sees' a load that has a unity ratio of real to apparent. Modern VFDs can reduce efficiency losses over the speed range, and do have capacitive characteristics on thier inputs, but even that doesn't help an ineffeciently designed motor.
     
  11. AlexR

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2008
    735
    54
    What's there to see?
    As a domestic user you are not charged for low power factor so nothing you do to the power factor is going to make the slightest difference to you power bills.
    This whole domestic power factor correction business is nothing more than a scam.
     
  12. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,778
    932
    I'll go remove the extra caps from my AC blower motor then...

    Didn't realize I was doing the impossible. THANKS
    :)

    (wish you had a smiley that rolled its eyes - but Oh well)
     
  13. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    I queried another member in regards to this concept, but never really got an answer. What is it that pf correction does to make a motor more efficient? I'm aware of phasing aux windings in single phase motors with caps. Is this what your referring to? I would like to know as I'm sure would other readers to better understand this mystical pf correction thing.

    I'll point you to whatever smileys you need to engage in effective discussion.
     
  14. russ_hensel

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 11, 2009
    818
    47

    The motor is not more efficient, the transmission lines to it are. You need to read up on the phase relations between current and voltage in circuits containing rl and c.
     
  15. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    I'll take that as a no vote. I'm hoping that Kermit2 will come back and justify his claim that efficiency of the motor is improved (with rolling eyes).
     
  16. majsyd2010

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 29, 2010
    61
    1
    Word of wisdoms ... Mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm, you gotta love this
     
Loading...