Positive clamper circuits.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Joezer, Dec 13, 2006.

  1. Joezer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 13, 2006
    4
    0
    I'm working on an op amp clamper circuit project. I'm looking for what type of applications they are used for. The information I have so far is that they are used in the following: Test equipment, radar systems, electric counter measure systems, and sonar systems.

    Could any one emphicise on why clamper circuits are used in these systems?
    If you have any other usefull information on this it would be helpfull.


    thank you.:D
     
  2. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    145
    A clamper circuit is designed to limit the voltage/current signal from exceeding a certain value. Therefore, they are commonly used in protection circuitry to guard against potential damage caused by such signals. They are also used (implicitly) in clipper circuits which are designed to regulate the output voltages of a particular signal without distorting the overall output waveform.

    I suppose rectifier circuits fall into this category? (I am open to opinions on this one).

    Dave
     
  3. Joezer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 13, 2006
    4
    0
    OK..i got you on that concept but like specificly for Test equipment for example.
     
  4. Joezer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 13, 2006
    4
    0
    And for my circuit, I have a clamper that has an output going form 0 to 10volts. What application would be used for that?
     
  5. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
    6,960
    145
    Well test equipment has to deal with a wide range of test parameters - some of which may be beyond the capabilities of the equipment itself. So when you hook the equipment up to do your test, the last thing you need is for the equipment to go 'pop'. The clamper circuit is designed to counteract against this problem.

    Your query is far too vague. Effectively the clamper would protect against outputs beyond the 0-10V range - though this is highly application specific.

    Dave
     
  6. Joezer

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 13, 2006
    4
    0
    OK. That will be all. Thank you dave.
     
Loading...