please help me, these complex, complicated circuits

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by PG1995, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. PG1995

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 15, 2011
    753
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    Hi

    If you find that this query doesn't belong here, then please move it to the section you deem appropriate. Thank you.

    I don't know every time I open an electronics book I get very much afraid after looking at those circuits. As an example have a look here:
    http://static.electro-tech-online.com/imgcache/2469-rychke2.gif

    How do you keep track of such complicated and complex circuits when solving them at school? What is your advice for me to overcome this fear? Sometimes, I simply slip into depression after looking at those circuits in the book. Please advise me what to do. When you were at school how you kept the track and solved the circuit. With simple circuits like this one:
    http://gangles.ca/images/SimpleCircuit.jpg

    It is fairly easy to imagine what's going on in the wires and how electrons etc. are moving. In other words one can create a mental picture for such a simple circuit. But what about those fearful circuits? Please help me.
     
  2. praondevou

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jul 9, 2011
    2,936
    488
    I agree sometimes it's difficult to understand why the designer chose a certain component/circuit/solution.

    First I try to find out what's the purpose of the circuit. This is usually known. It's also good to separate the circuit into function blocks.

    I also try to identify first:
    Power supplies
    Inputs/outputs

    If you identified inputs/outputs you can usually determine the signal flow. It might be more difficult if there are feedback loops, though.


    These circuits you can solve with one of the common theorems, one of them being superposition.
    They are not difficult, just annoying :)
     
  3. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    For me the secret is to break them down. Most of those circuits are active filters, and are straight out of some text book or another. Learn the individual circuits, and the whole becomes obvious.
     
  4. russ_hensel

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 11, 2009
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  5. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    I also post on this website and on the other website.
    Can you see these extremely simple opamp amplifiers in the "complicated" circuit?
    Weren't you taught about these extremely simple amplifiers?
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
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    Between the time I started electronics and I went to college was a 4 year period. People aren't born knowing this stuff. Even in college it was 2nd year stuff.

    There is no substitute for reading, lots of it.
     
  7. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
    9,411
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    No.
    The opamps are 16Hz to 100kHz amplifiers and some invert the signal, there are no active filters.
    I think the circuit is a background-noise-cancelling circuit for headphones that have electret microphones attached to them.

    I found the project in the library of the website of www.headwize.com .
    It has the same schematic and a complete circuit description. It also shows how to build it.
     
  8. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    Just remember that fear is a natural response to the unknown. The challenge is to know it.

    When I come across complex circuits, I seek to simplify. In electrical that means line drawings, and electronics that means function or block drawings. Circuit schematics are typically grouped into functions, so I'll often step back and visualize the functions. Of course one must have basic knowledge of the functions, and that comes with study and exploration
     
  9. PG1995

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 15, 2011
    753
    5
    Hi

    I'm finding your suggestions helpful and encouraging. I'm grateful for your help.

    Best regards
    PG
     
  10. Jensen

    New Member

    Mar 9, 2011
    5
    0
    As mentioned, the best way is to know the basics of electronics and then break down the circuit into smaller blocks.
     
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