PicBasic help

Discussion in 'Programmer's Corner' started by Webbi, Nov 1, 2013.

  1. Webbi

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    Good day everyone, I’m new in this arena soliciting your advise.
    Can anyone give me some advice on a decision I’ve to make where Pic-Basic Programming is concern? I need a kit / software with a very simple learning curve... (Assembly and C language scares me a whole lot).

    I want to write codes and have them function on the fly by using a development / evaluation board. The Pic of choice is the 16fxxx series, please advise which system you believe is the most appropriate for my needs, at present controlling Leds is my first project of choice.
    Someone recommended the following site to me but I still need your expertly advise, this is only a board, - I’m unaware if there is a special software to work with it, please inform -- Thank you.
    http://www.ebay.com/itm/PIC-MCU-Microcontroller-Development-Board-PIC-16F877A-/251312262259

    Webbie
     
  2. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    PBP is easier to use with Microcode Studio than MPLAB, but you still need MPASM. I have tried development boards, but the best platform for me is a combination of a solderless breadboard with plug in components and subassemblies. I use a PICkit2 as my programmer.
     
  3. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I've never been a fan of PBP due to it's very high purchase price and some critical shortcomings (ignoring improper code without any notice), though it has been several years since I used it. (It was about the only choice at the time).

    I do recommend Oshonsoft for a Basic compiler as it works incredibly well and is quote inexpensive. There are some sample programs listed, though not quite for a pure beginner. No boards either, he does outline how to build them.

    Mikroelectronika makes a good Basic compiler (I have not personally used it) and some good development boards. I do not know what tutorials they have.

    Parallax makes a "What's a Microcontroller?" Parts Kit and manual that works with their "Board of Education." These are PIC based computers meant as learning devices, and are very well supported.

    Do note that without reservation I suggest you start your first project on a known good tested assembled board: in short, a development kit. There are too many things that can go wrong if you roll your own.
     
  4. Art

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    If you buy a pickitII in the right package you get a small dev board with it,
    and it has a row of less on it.

    All for PBP here :)
     
  5. Webbi

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    Thank you guys for the feedback, I'll review all your ideas with kind consideration before making a decision.

    Art, can you elaborate a bit more on the pickitII kit.

    Thanks again.
     
  6. Art

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    pickitII is the pic programmer I got from Microchip,
    that has now been replace by pickit III.
    There is likely a deal where you get the programmer, and a small dev board like I did.
    I actually gave mine away at the time.
     
  7. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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  8. Art

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    That is the one I got, and didn't know you could still get a pickitII.
    That is the dev board that came with mine, it has a row of eight leds,
    and a demo program to run them.

    RISC asm is difficult for beginners.
    The reason I advocate PBP is it's an easy onramp to learning assembler,
    by using inline assembler, assembler interrupts, and later, full program disassembly.
     
  9. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    PICkit II ??? You can still get a PICkit I !!!

    While I agree any high level compiler makes a better start then working bare assembler, PBP is the least choice out of the many (more then 10?) PIC compilers I've used.
     
  10. Webbi

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 13, 2013
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    Gentlemen you're quite helpful with your mental libraries in this area, I'll check on the PBP and mikrobasic to decide which has the best debugger, providing another source doesn't come along and open up the variety arena,, which is most welcome.

    webbi
     
  11. Art

    Distinguished Member

    Sep 10, 2007
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    Well you can always start with Microchip's C30 compiler which is essentially
    free, unless you need some specific features that a beginner does not.

    Most people will say that C is more difficult to start out on, but I disagree.
    Any pic program written in BASIC can also be written directly in C with
    slightly different syntax, and only a few little hurdles where lookup tables
    are concerned.

    C will also likely prove more useful in the long run.
     
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