PIC Programmer

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by victorment, Feb 25, 2011.

  1. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
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    0
    I am a student and I am new to programming PIC. Do you have any circuit that I can use to program microcontrollers? I wan't to buy but I can't because its expensive. Can someone give a schematic for a cheap PIC programmer? Hope you comply with my post. Thanks in advance. :confused:
     
  2. surajddk

    New Member

    Jan 3, 2011
    9
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    here you can find low cost PIC Programmer Circuit & article which explanning PIC Programming from the beginning!!
     
  3. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
    52
    0
    thanks for helping but I can't find the circuit its all different kinds of forums.
     
  4. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,646
    2,345
    Hello,

    @surajddk:
    Please stop linking to an other forum where registration is required.
    Post the ciruits or pictures here localy.

    Bertus
     
  5. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
    3,779
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  6. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
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    You can get PICKIT2 clones fairly cheaply. Mine was £19 including postage on eBay. It can't be much more than the cost of building one which may or may not work.
     
  7. surajddk

    New Member

    Jan 3, 2011
    9
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    Circuit which i mentioned in my previous post attached herewith. It s doc file & contain more than 10 pages.
     
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  8. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    +1

    I had a friend from back east visit and he purchased $500 worth of a variety of Microchip stuff for us to play with this week learning to do things with PIC processors. Knowing what I know now, if I wanted to get working with PIC stuff, I'd buy a PICkit2 as Mark77 suggested. You can get one with a small PC board with a 16F690 mid-range PIC on it and it comes with a CD with the IDE containing the assembler and an evaluation copy of the HiTech C compiler, plus 12 lessons taking you through driving LEDs, reading analog voltages, timers, and interrupts. Pretty well done for around a $50 kit. If you can get just the PICkit 2 by itself, then all you need is a USB cable and some wires and you can program chips using a prototyping board.

    While that $50 may be a bit steep for a student, I think it's good money to spend, as you can then spend your time actually learning to program the chips and building projects with them. The low to mid-range chips cost in the $0.5 to $2 range, which means it's pretty cheap to build some nice projects.
     
  9. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
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    You can buy an original PICkit 3 for £29 from Farnell, plus £3 shipping. Given that this will program anything, and that it includes an adjustable low current (50mA max) supply, I think it's well worth it.
     
  10. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
    141
    That's a good device too and it can also let you do in-circuit debugging (both in C and assembly) on a number of chips (some chips require a separate header). I've heard that some folks have had problems with the PICkit 3, at least earlier versions; we used it and it worked fine.

    If one was willing to spend about $125, I'd recommend the PICDEM Lab, which is a PC board with sockets for 8, 14, and 20 pin processors. It also has a nice prototyping area and some ancillary on-board devices. It will run either from a 9 V battery or a 9-12 V wall wart; there's an on-board LM317 that lets you adjust the Vdd voltage from about 1.5 to 5.1 volts by turning a pot on the board.

    What's nice for a beginner is that it includes a 5 V DC motor, hook-up wires, resistors, caps, LEDs, a thermistor, some p-channel and n-channel MOSFETs, and a selection of microcontrollers. This lets a beginner hook up some circuits and pretty much have everything needed to develop and program the low-end to mid-level PIC processors. It also comes with the PICkit 2.
     
  11. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
    52
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  12. eblc1388

    Senior Member

    Nov 28, 2008
    1,542
    102
    If you don't fully understand how the hardware of the programmer circuit works, then the chance of making it work would be very slim.

    All the users(well nearly) here have told you to buy a cheap one and enjoy the fun of PIC first rather than to build one and ends up with a setup that don't work.

    Do you know what the problem is then? Your code, the PIC, or the DIY programmer?

    After you have built a few working PIC projects, then you can build whatever programmers you want.
     
  13. debjit625

    Well-Known Member

    Apr 17, 2010
    790
    186
    (In circuit serial programming) ICSP is used to connect the programmer to the mcu circuit board so that you dont have to remove the mcu from circuit board for programming its a very useful feature,for now you can forget about ICSP just insert the PIC into the IC base (if PIC have more pin than IC base then you have to use ICSP)and connect the com port to your PC ,that will do the programming.

    The above programmer is a JDM type that use RS232 i.e.. com port,programmer needs a high voltage (Vpp) to program the mcu so some times the RS232 is not able to provide with a very high level of signal int these the power supply is taken from the RS232 port only,many times the JDM programmer dont works.
    As per me you should use programmer that have external power supply like parallel port programmer here is one with programming software....

    http://www.oshonsoft.com/picprog.html

    Good luck
     
  14. victorment

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 4, 2010
    52
    0
    Thanks a lot man for helping me. Ill try this one.
     
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