Physical punishment on capacitors, ect?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by RiG615, Dec 9, 2008.

  1. RiG615

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
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    What is the physical durability of

    1. capacitors ((say 30 volts and 10 μf))

    2. small motors ((say a 3 volt .2 amp motor))

    3. resistors

    5. 555 timer ICs

    thanks for your input!
     
  2. jpanhalt

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 18, 2008
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    Most of then will run under distilled water a lot longer than you can. Is that your question?

    Is your other question about the physical punishment of ECT (electroconvulsive therapy)?

    John
     
  3. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Do you mean how many G's can they withstand, or how big a dent will render them inoperable?

    Why do you think small motors are related to resistors, for instance?
     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2008
  4. RiG615

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
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    sorry i should have eleaborated on what i meant

    I mean, if I build a circuit with these things, then take that circuit and throw it across the room as the circuits normal operation. So if every time I use this thing I am throwing across the room -can it survive that? and if not how can i make it continually survive that punishment?

    jpanhalt: i meat etc (etcetera), sorry i always spell that wrong

    Beenthere: I was just listing items for the above situation

    sorry bout that, any input will help
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Use a metal container and use potting compound to support the components. The Copperhead artillery round has a fuze that can counts the floors it penetrates before detonation. For that matter, the proximity fuze was developed in WWII and survived (mostly) being fired out of high velocity guns.

    A printed circuit board is going to be the most likely failure in a throwing situation. As soon as the foil breaks, it's as if all the components failed. Same for a solder joint, if wired point-to-point.
     
  6. RiG615

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
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    Thanks Beenthere, few questions

    1. where do you get potting compound? is there any other names for it?

    2. Would other glue work? could i just drown the circuit in Elmer's glue? or gorilla glue??

    3. If I use potting compound or glue,, How much would padding help (decreasing the force on the circuit) or can these things take a lot of force going through them?

    Thanks
     
  7. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
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    Use potting compound. It is electrically neutral. Make sure everything wokd before you pot it. Bud Industries has potting boxes. The exact answer about force would have to do with internal construction of components.
     
  8. RiG615

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
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    potting compound seems kind of expensive... though in the long run its probably not

    if im working with only max of 9v and under max of 200 mah do you think elmer's glue or gorilla glue would work? can i test it easily?
     
  9. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    Instead of Elmer's or Gorilla, try JB Weld. JB Weld will be much closer in composition to a real potting compound. Of course, JB Weld might also end up being a smidge more expensive than real potting compound...
     
  10. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    I would not use either Elmer's or Gorilla Glue.
    Elmer's is a water-based polymer. It will shrink when it dries; any trapped moisture will corrode components.

    Gorilla Glue does strange things when it cures. I haven't used it much for that reason.

    J-B Weld is really strong stuff, but their might be some conductivity issues.

    Potting compound doesn't change dimensions as it cures, and if directions are carefully followed, there should be no voids in the material when it's cured. Some compounds remain somewhat flexible.

    Red RTV might be used, but if put on thickly it will take forever to cure. RTV also emits acetic acid during curing, which can cause corrosion. Curing can be sped up somewhat by placing the assembly in a low-temperature oven.
     
  11. RiG615

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
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    what about epoxy?
     
  12. RiG615

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Nov 13, 2008
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    I'm seriuosly considering gorilla glue...

    please -help change my mind!!
     
  13. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
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    Don't use "Gorilla glue".

    Gorilla glue is intended for joining wood surfaces together, like rungs on a wooden stool, or plywood joints - not electronic assemblies. Some of it gets sucked into the pores of the wood, and some of it bulges out. I have never measured it for electrical properties. It's not designed for that.

    If you want potting compound, get some. Call up the manufacturers, and talk with them. They'll suggest what compounds to use, if you give them enough information.

    You have yet to give US enough information.
     
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