phasor form? need help

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by acelectr, Jan 17, 2011.

  1. acelectr

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 28, 2010
    73
    0
    Hi all, I'm stucked in this prob. , the only problem is how can I convert 5+5cos(2000(pi)t) to phasor form, obviously there is no phase but what is the magnitude?:confused:
     
  2. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    214
    I'm going to take a guess here as I've just started on phasors in physics but it would be 5, as that is the multiple for the cos(x) function - either that, or it is 10, because of the add.
     
  3. acelectr

    Thread Starter Member

    Aug 28, 2010
    73
    0
    well the answer is 5 but why?
     
  4. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
    2,613
    214
    You'd be better off asking your physics teacher, I think it's 5 because it's the number before cos(x) but don't quote me on that.
     
  5. radbrad

    New Member

    Jan 17, 2011
    3
    0
    K, it's been a while since e-fundies, but I believe the answer is because the first 5 being added is a DC offset. Therefore, it's rather irrelevant as far as AC formulas and equations are concerned and can be left off.

    But look it up to be sure ;)
     
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