PH sensor interfacing

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ANICETH, Feb 22, 2016.

  1. ANICETH

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    Hi there
    Am working with the project on water quality measurement for fish ponds and i am getting difficulties to work with water conditions on the choice of sensors like PH, turbidity, ammonia and dissolved oxygen. can i get some help there?
     
  2. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Go to Omega Engineering. They have all of this stuff.

    http://www.omega.com/section/water-soil-analysis-instrumentation.html
     
  3. ANICETH

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    thank you GopherT but i don't want the meters i just want the sensors modules
     
  4. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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  5. ANICETH

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 21, 2016
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    thank you i understand now, i think the project will go on well
     
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  6. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    Once I went for an interview at a firm that made PH meters, I didn't get that job, but they showed me round.

    The input stage PCBs had guard bands and slots cut in them so condensation etc couldn't influence the readings. They also used very high input impedance MOS circuitry.

    Stick with bought interface equipment unless you really know your stuff.
     
  7. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    A pH probe basically is a very small battery. Correction - whatever you were thinking, 1/1000th of that. After a pH circuit project, a chemistry lab potentiostat was a breeze.

    ak
     
  8. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    I guess the firm I interviewed at must've had some good reason for making their product as complex as they did.
     
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  9. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    There are two paths for an analytical chemist. Either the wet lab or the electronics/instrumentation path. Wet lab methods are considered old school and most grad students walk down the instrumentation path.

    I cannot tell you how often you see some new analytical professor or one of his grad students looking for projects (funding) to save another research group money by making instruments in-house. Almost all failed miserably. I've only seen one guy really excel and he was something special. A double major Chem E/EE undergrad working on a PhD in analytical chemistry. He could get the devices designed and built but, in the end, the projects all had some faults - basically prototypes. It is much better to buy something that had a reasonable R&D effort attached and/or experienced people doing the work.
     
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