performance difference? Pb-free solder v.s. conv. solder

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by analogworm, Mar 15, 2013.

  1. analogworm

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    Circuits were soldered with the conventional lead-containing solder by auto-soldering machine. The performance and reliability were qualified. Now customers want lead-free products so I have to change to lead-free auto-soldering. Would the performance of the same circuit change when the solder is changed? Does the lead-free circuit provide the same reliability and temperature-related characteristics as the conventional one?

    Greatly appreciate any response.
     
  2. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    I prefer conventional solder because lead-free solder has a much higher melting point. This makes it more difficult to get a good joint, increasing the likelihood of creating a cold solder joint. You'll need the right machinery/iron/solder station to combat this problem. This is based on personal experience--I always had trouble soldering with the lead-free stuff. I recommend a temperature-controlled soldering station to ensure you have the proper temperature for making clean solder joints.
     
  3. antonv

    Member

    Nov 27, 2012
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    The circuits should perform the same if your solder process is good.

    What kind of temperature range are these products designed for?
     
  4. analogworm

    Thread Starter New Member

    Mar 15, 2013
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    The working temperature is -20C --- 85C. Any problem?
     
  5. antonv

    Member

    Nov 27, 2012
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    27
    No, you should be good then.
     
  6. timescope

    Member

    Dec 14, 2011
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    Last edited: Mar 16, 2013
  7. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    To reflow lead free solder exposes the entire PCB to temperatures some 45 degrees C higher then conventional solder.

    Additionally, there seems to be a problem with tin itself. Try googling tin whiskers.

    But it seems we're stuck with it in a lot of markets.
     
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