Perfboard Construction with Insulation/Potting

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by tracecom, May 14, 2010.

  1. tracecom

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    I am building a small circuit on perfboard. After it is completed and tested, I am thinking of coating the bottom side (wires, pads, solder, etc.) with rubber cement in order to provide some mechanical protection as well as electrical insulation.

    Good idea or not? Is there a better choice? How about some of this stuff used to dip tool handles in; would that work?

    Has anyone actually done this and how did it turn out?
     
  2. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    I think it would be better to mount it proper in some sort of electronic housing. And also mount all cables going in and out with proper strain relief.
    You can get cheap plastic housing in most electronic stores
     
  3. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    anything non-conductive will work really. Assuming no parts get hot enough to damage the coating. Rubber cement is flammable.. (I think they actually coat people with it to do the flamming man stuff in movies,etc..)

    But a protective box/enclosure with standoffs,etc.. is a better idea
     
  4. kingdano

    Member

    Apr 14, 2010
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    a cheap plastic project box is a good way to go.

    if you want to pot it for some other reason, anything non-conductive is fine - use hot glue if you like.
     
  5. jamjes

    Member

    May 10, 2010
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    I've been using whitetack (like bluetack) to support the board, and epoxy resin the whole thing into the box. You can leave the whitetack in and resin it too, or try to be neat and remove it after.
     
  6. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Depending on the size of the board, and if you have to access it in the future, a resin cast is quick and easy. Window caulking works well and is cheap at home depot.. And you can remove it..if you HAD to. It MUST cure fully before you apply power.
     
  7. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Ask yourself this question, what are the odds I will have to work on the circuit again, either to repair or to modify it. If you think it is easy to build then potting it is an excellent idea, however, if you ever want to see those components again mount it in a box. There are situations where both are good ideas, potting definitely gives the circuit better environmental protection.
     
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