Perf boards with copper pads?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by spinnaker, Dec 14, 2009.

  1. spinnaker

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    The last time I built a project (eons ago), I would use the plain perf board for my projects.

    One of the few things "The Shack" carries these days is perf board. But these have copper pads.

    I have never used them before. What are the pros and cons of this type of board when compared to the plain perf board?

    What is the recommended way to solder one of these up? Say I want to connect the lead of one component to a lead of an adjacent component? Do I solder one lead to one pad another lead to a second then just bridge the gap with a bit of solder??
     
  2. SgtWookie

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    Jul 17, 2007
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    Which did you get?
    The 276-150 is convenient if you're prototyping something with ICs.
    They also have some with just all individual copper pads. Several different styles, actually.

    Anyway, you can solder a lead to a pad, to make sure it won't move around. Then you can route the remaining part of the lead to where you want it to connect to, or use buss wire. RS sells small gauge tin plated solid buss wire.
     
  3. spinnaker

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    Didn't get anything yet.


    OK So I understand now. I will have to take a closer look at them. Thanks.
     
  4. Paragon

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    Dec 8, 2009
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    I usually go with some sort of pad-per-hole perfboard like you are referring to. Just easy to solder the component to the pad (copper goes on under side, components inserted from the topside) and use the rest of the leads or bare wire and make my traces tacking down long traces to copper pads. Just have to make sure you do not make any solder bridges or have bare wires touch other pads and short.
     
  5. hgmjr

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    Jan 28, 2005
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    One of the things that I have found about the single-sided perf-boards with copper pads is that the pads are very susceptible for coming detached when exposed to exccessive heat during soldering.

    The ones that have pads on both sides with plated-thru holes are more likely to survive the rigors of soldering.

    hgmjr
     
  6. SgtWookie

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    Jul 17, 2007
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    Excellent point.

    Radio Shack boards should prove to be a wonderful testing ground for your soldering skills, as the copper is extremely thin.

    And unless you're really good at it, you'll "lift" a bunch of pads.

    Ask me how I know this. :rolleyes: ;)
     
  7. Paragon

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    Dec 8, 2009
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    Yeah.. the other thing with the pph single sided is the pads are usually large so clearance between pads can be tight. PTH (plated through hole) boards are very nice to work with. I have a headphone amplifier built on two PTH boards. One day I will finish that project.
     
  8. spinnaker

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    So, I'm guessing low temp as possible on my iron? :) And soder fast. :)


    Any tips on how low I can go?
     
  9. Paragon

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    Dec 8, 2009
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    Most eutectic solder I use around 650°F for smaller stuff (possibly even 600°) but the main thing is a clean tip with a very small amount of fresh solder on it to help in heat transfer to both the component lead and pad at the same time. A good joint should not take very long to do.
    I have never had an issue of lifting a solder pad even with the crappy ratshack iron I used to have (and that was soldering without a sponge)
     
  10. davebee

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 22, 2008
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    I just ran into the same situation last weekend - I went to Radio Shack for some ordinary perfboard, but all they carried were those padded boards, so I bought one.

    I was kind of surprised - it worked really well. I had two ribbon cable sockets to mount, and they were much more stable with solder pads to hold them firm. I had about a dozen resistors to mount and they also held much better with pads to solder them to. The board also used a couple of wire-wrap DIP sockets, which the pads really didn't help with as I didn't want to solder them.

    Overall, for this project, the copper pad board worked really well. I'd buy it again.

    I'd say they most benefit boards with lots of little analog parts, like resistors and caps, that need a firm mount. Things like wire-wrap sockets where the pins are already fixed probably don't benefit quite so much.
     
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