Pentagon tiling

Discussion in 'Math' started by tjohnson, Aug 17, 2015.

  1. tjohnson

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 23, 2014
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    In the news on Wikipedia:
    [​IMG]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pentagonal_tiling
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2015
    strantor and DerStrom8 like this.
  2. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    Very interesting. I wonder how they come up with these things?
     
  3. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    They'll have to use smaller words for me.
     
  4. Glenn Holland

    Member

    Dec 26, 2014
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    Pentagonal tiling huh?

    Glad to know I have another option for retiling my shower!!! :)
     
  5. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Tiling can actually be an interesting challenge. I was having a large room tiled using using three tiles with different dimensions to give it a sort of "random" look. But it was anything but random. I had used a drawing program to work out the precise arrangement that would give a satisfying repeating unit using a combination of the 3 tiles. The appropriate number of all 3 tiles were ordered and the tile mason arrived. We then discovered that one of the shapes was ~1/8" less than the nominal dimension I had used for the drawing. This meant that I would have uneven grout lines if I had stuck with the original layout.

    The tile mason was ready to head home. But using my computer I was able in minutes to reconfigure the layout to once again have uniform grout lines and a pleasingly "random" pattern. His jaw dropped but he did the job and it looked great. I'm not sure I convinced him to start using computerized layout, but he had to at least consider it.
     
  6. tjohnson

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Dec 23, 2014
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    That sounds like good drawing software. What was the name of it?
     
  7. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    Hmmm, it was a while ago. I think it was Freehand. This was an excellent postscript drawing program for Mac. It was eventually bought by Adobe and then killed, so they could sell their Illustrator instead. But they never matched the features that Freehand users had come to love.

    Anyway, the key is vector drawing at device-independent scale. There are other choices for this. I'm currently using Intaglio, which is an inexpensive option that is darn good.