PCB Drill holesizes for various components

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by RodneyB, Feb 13, 2013.

  1. RodneyB

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    633
    13
    Is there a chart that shows the standard size hole for various electronic components. I am making my own PCB's and would like to know the standrd drillhole size if there is one
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,770
  3. SPQR

    Member

    Nov 4, 2011
    379
    48
  4. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
    4,769
    969
    I've been using this for a while..
     
  5. DC_Kid

    Distinguished Member

    Feb 25, 2008
    638
    9
    i use the wire spec from datasheet of every component i buy. choosing right hole size will vary depending on if its a two-wire axial or radial item vs say a 16pin dip. on dip's i like the holes a tad larger so its easier to insert the dip as dip pins tend to not be on-center or in alignment, etc. i stopped drilling some time ago, i use DipTrace and send file off to be made at a place in CA. post #4 looks to be an ok recommendation.
     
  6. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
    7,386
    1,605
    You hit the data sheet for each and every component you use and make an appropriate sized hole. mcgyvr's sheet seems good to go.

    One of my typical mistakes is making holes too small.
     
  7. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
    4,867
    992
    I typically use are .034 - .035" for most everything.
     
  8. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    The thin drillbits are more expensive and break more often. I just use 0.8mm drillbit for everything, unless something has real fat legs then switch to 1.0mm. And buy 0.8mm and 1.0mm bits in bulk packs like 10 or 20 at a time to get costs down.

    That also saves time in switching drillbits around and checking which holes are which size, so it is less work there too.
     
  9. SPQR

    Member

    Nov 4, 2011
    379
    48
    Do you use carbide or high speed steel?
     
  10. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    Steel (HSS). Carbide is brittle and breaks, and there's a lot of really crap blunt "carbide" tools on the market it's become the new cutting tool buzzword to fool noobs into buying garbage products from Asian suppliers just because it has "carbide" on the ad.

    HSS tiny drills are cheap and drill just as fast (often faster as they are sharp) in a hand operated press. If you like you can sharpen then on any bench grinder too.
     
    SPQR likes this.
  11. RodneyB

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Apr 28, 2012
    633
    13
    for my sins I purchased "Ccrbide" Drill bits from china what junk cheap and nasty just does not ecplain them. Not to mention that if you look at them the wrong way they snap.

    Thus the reason why I am looking for the correct drill hole sizes so I can by decent drill bits and the correct size.
     
  12. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,770
    Are you kidding? Sharpen a .031 inch drill bit? You must have much better eyes than I have!
     
  13. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,432
    3,360
    I use carbide drill bits, 0.033" or 0.035". To prevent breaking them there must be no lateral forces, i.e. the board and the drill head must be rigidly held with no side movement. I use a Unimat miniature lathe set up as a drill press running at the highest speed.
     
  14. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    You don't need "eyes" as such, just hold the drill bit at roughly the right angles and touch it to the grinder, as with all drillbits. :)

    The end features of the drillbits are not that critical, I once had a drill bit that snapped, and only had a few holes left so just kept drilling with it and the broken end drilled about as good as a new drill. The important thing is just to put a sharp edge on it, not the really rounded off edge of a blunt drillbit.
     
Loading...