path map for learning electronics from the very basics

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ahmedsamir1350, Feb 29, 2016.

  1. ahmedsamir1350

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
    5
    0
    Hi,
    I searched a lot for help and really didn't have the answer for what i need . I Have questions that i had surfed the internet including this website for an appropriate answer, but I couldn't find one.
    note: if you could answer in a bit detailed way supported with resources for accomplish it i will be more happy)

    Simply I'm an engineering student and I'm a self-learner ,and i really like being so. currently I'm at the lowest basic level of understanding circuits and electricity in general and I needed help in designing a curriculum to get from this novice level to at least an intermediate level in at a maximum of a year of self-learning,I think it can be achieved before this period. the kind of curriculum that i try to organize rely on some concept that i try before with programming and it seemed suitable for my learning style


    Firstly, What are the pre requirements for learning circuits ,arduino ,and this kind of electronics in gene?
    secondly, If I wanted to divide circuits into components and building blocks that after reaching a comfort level in understanding them and how they work i can use them as components -in other term basic and advanced building blocks-?
    thirdly, what are the common fields that is related to circuits like specific technologies and techniques?
    is there any advice or better approach for learning circuits in the manner of project learning techniques i will be extremely happy for knowing it from professional?
     
  2. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,743
    4,789
    If you want to learn electronics from the very basics, then the best place to start is an introductory course in electricity and magnetism, which is often the Physics II course at many colleges. You can get textbooks for a course like this very cheaply at Amazon and other places. Then you would get a Circuits I text to learn the basic analysis techniques for linear circuits.

    While doing this, play around with lots of simple circuits in a hands-on fashion and find some simple projects to build and troubleshoot so that you get a practical feel for electronics in addition to the book knowledge that you gain.
     
  3. ahmedsamir1350

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
    5
    0
    @WBahn I know this approach and it's really very boring to walk in a path without seeing the full road or the final destination could you pls for example specify more the pre requirements for learning electronics like the general topics that every one who start learning electronics must be aware of 'more precisely than just electricity and magnetism' ?
     
  4. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,743
    4,789
    If learning the foundations of something is going to be too boring, then perhaps you should find something else to pursue -- there's nothing that says you have to love a field of endeavor, but never lose sight of the fact that you will always be competing against people that do.
     
  5. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,647
    2,346
  6. ahmedsamir1350

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
    5
    0
    @WBahn This is not what i exactly mean I already know that the theoretical basics of anything is boring. what i meant is not skipping those theoretical parts, but knowing why should I learn them before diving deep into them,seeing the whole picture form a high perspective, For example instead of just studying calculus purely on solving problems like the integration or differentiation of an equation, seeing a real application of what i expect to use those skills of solving problem in real life ,seeing the whole story why even bothering study this field of knowledge.
     
  7. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,743
    4,789
    Applications are all around you!

    Want to be involved in designing the next generation cell phone? Learn electronics.

    Want to design and build your own radio transmitters and receivers? Learn electronics.

    Want to go into robotic controls? Learn electronics.

    Want to design computers? Learn electronics.

    Want to get into home automation? Learn electronics.

    Want to design integrated circuits? Learn electronics.

    Want to design consumer electronics? Learn electronics.

    Want to get into industrial process control? Learn electronics.

    Want to get into avionics? Learn electronics.
     
    ahmedsamir1350 likes this.
  8. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
    3,242
    619
    The traditional approach is to learn a subject from the bottom up. That, as you put it, can be tedious; but that will give you the best understanding of underlying concepts and increase your chances of becoming competent.

    If you want to learn top down, because you desire more instantaneous gratification; people have done that too. Check this site for some discussions and you'll see that many/most regret taking that approach and that it took them longer to become competent. You will have gaps in your knowledge that you won't be aware of. Although learning the traditional way can still leave you with gaps; I speak from experience...
     
    ahmedsamir1350 likes this.
  9. ahmedsamir1350

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
    5
    0
    @dl324
    I'm feel a bit convinced about this approach. Do you have an advice like things that you hoped you really know or did in your first studies of electronics?
     
  10. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
    3,242
    619
    When I was studying electronics, I didn't question what I was being taught or why. I took it for granted that the instructors knew best how to teach the subjects. I didn't start to become competent with that knowledge until I needed to understand or design circuits on my own.

    That being said, I do have concerns with the way students who visit the Homework Help and Projects forums appear to be struggling to understand very basic concepts. When I was in school, there were no on-line resources (the internet hadn't been invented yet); but, then again, I didn't need any help to understand what I was being taught. I never had to ask any questions outside of the classroom.

    I don't know if the problem is the students, the teachers, or a combination; but there seems to be a lack of comprehension with many of the students who come to AAC for help.
     
  11. blocco a spirale

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 18, 2008
    1,438
    368
    If there is a particular area that interests you e.g. audio, music, radio, electronic security etc. start by either building kits or reproducing published designs. Take the time to try to understand what is happening and you will soon start to recognise common components and circuits. When you find that you don't understand something, forums like this are a good place to ask for help.

    Many people started off by building projects published in magazines back in the 70s and 80s and I still believe that this is a very good way in but if you want to design your own circuits it's important that you also supplement this by learning the theory behind the designs.
     
  12. ahmedsamir1350

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 29, 2016
    5
    0
    I first I want to learn by designing already existed circuits and projects ,also, use them to really understand the theoretical parts more. Like demonstrating the optics theory in physics by making some experiments with lenses. I really want to learn the theoretical parts, but with expectation and vision with what is up next i understand this area and how i will use it then or why it's important
    pls look at this scheme where i tried to demonstrate what i need to know ahead before really digging deep into it.
    https://coggle.it/diagram/VtNTq4N3mz0YmNRV
     
  13. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,743
    4,789
    I think one thing I DID do, which was a huge help, was that I was always building circuits for practical things that were usually a bit beyond my present understanding of the theory or what the options were. As a result, I was always building circuits that really pushed my abilities to get them to work and, as a consequence, were often pretty poor solutions to the problem at hand. But not only did I learn a hell of a lot in the process, but I was always in a position to see how what I learned the next semester could have been used to make my prior projects better. This also helped me gain an appreciation for the strengths and weakness of various approaches to solving problems.
     
  14. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,743
    4,789
    There are a number of factors at play.

    One thing to keep in mind is that the students that comprehend the material well don't come here for help -- so we have a highly non-representative sampling.

    But I definitely agree that the overall level of comprehension has gotten decidedly worse over the years (and I'm sure it started well before I stepped onto a college campus). There's plenty of blame to go around and teachers, students, parents, society, and technology each get to claim their share of it.
     
  15. hobbyist

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 10, 2008
    764
    56
    I'm not a professional, just a hobbyist in this field, but I can share my method of gaining understanding in basic electronics.

    I bought a Radio shack 160 in one electronics lab.

    Then I got my notebook, and started building circuits according to instructions given.

    Then if the circuit worked as promised, I began removing one component at a time, seeing how the circuit behaved, and took lots of notes, because I din't know anything about burning transistors up, I went through a lot of burnt components, again taking notes, then I would replace component values and took notes of the results.

    My goal for every published circuit, in the instruction manual that came with the kit was to I could get it and still have the circuit somewhat still working.remove every component, that did not make a lot of significant difference to the overall circuit working, until I got the circuit down to the most minimal components,

    Then I took notes of what happens If I change values of these components, finally after enough reverse engineering of these circuits, I began to get some idea of why the components needed to be in there, so I just kept on rearranging the circuit diagrams until I understood a little bit of how the circuit works.

    I went through notebooks after notebooks of experiments results.

    Then after all that, even though I only wanted this as a hobby and not a profession, I took 2 homestudy courses from NRI, (Basic electronics, and Electronic circuit design), got my diplomas, and some real valuable circuit design course material, and test equipment, then I took one homestudy course with CIE, (electronics engineering), recieved a lot of valuable circuit design material books from there too.

    These courses made learning electronics very enjoyable, because when they would pose math questions, they would always include a electronic design criteria, so a very boring math equation, became exciting, when they showed how it was used to design a circuit.

    That's my experience on a hobby level in this field.
     
    ahmedsamir1350 likes this.
Loading...