Parallel circuits

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by AlexGT, Feb 13, 2008.

  1. AlexGT

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 13, 2008
    2
    0
    Hi, I'm currently having trouble to know what resistors in the following circuit are in parallel or are in series, I do know about ohms law, kerchoff's law and superposition theorem to get other information, but I'm trying to simplify the circuit to find the current using I = V/R.

    The marked resistiors is a load resistor.


    [​IMG]



    Simplified:

    [​IMG]

    Thanks
     
  2. bthistle

    New Member

    Feb 12, 2008
    6
    0
    well i will give you a hint first Rtotal then work back wards
     
  3. Management

    Active Member

    Sep 18, 2007
    306
    0
    Two resistors are in series if they have the same current running through them. Therefore you can use your imagination to see what is actually in series.

    A resistor has two nodes. One at each end. If two resistors share the same two nodes then they are in parallel.

    After simplifying two resistors, look at the circuit you have created and re-determine what is in parallel and/or in series.
     
  4. AlexGT

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 13, 2008
    2
    0
    Well these are the steps I've took:

    [​IMG]
    Then:

    [​IMG]

    Then:

    [​IMG]

    And finally:

    [​IMG]

    I think though that R4 and R5 need an equivelent resistor in parallel, and I'm unsure where it would go, any help would be appreciated.
     
  5. RiJoRI

    Well-Known Member

    Aug 15, 2007
    536
    26
    Hint 1: Work from the point farthest from the voltage source, and move in towards that source. That way, you will only have 1 set of series or parallel resistors to worry about.

    Hint 2: Combine the serial resistors first: If you have a 3-ohm and a 7-ohm resistor in series, and a 4-ohm and 6-ohm resistor in series, and the two sets are parallel (whew!) you would get the equivalents for the two sets of resistors in series before calculating their parallel equivalence (5 ohms, FWIW).

    --Rich
     
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