Oscillator test

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Martin Nikovski, Nov 16, 2015.

  1. Martin Nikovski

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2015
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    Hello! I am really happy to find this forum and I hope that we can all benefit from our interaction here.

    I have the following question:

    Say I have an oscillator but I have only VDD and GND pins working. This way, I can apply voltage to it, but I can't get an output signal (at least not via a wire)... I have to propose a way to test whether the oscillator is working properly (creating an oscillating signal) or it's defective. So, it has to be some "remote" wireless method. I would appreciate any ideas. Thank you in advance!

    Best regards
     
  2. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    It depends upon the oscillator type, its physical construction and the oscillation frequency.

    If there is no internal bypass, put a few ohms between the power supply bypass capacitor and the power input of the oscillator and try to find the oscillator with a spectrum analyzer connected to the power input. If you know the frequency of the oscillator, try to find it with a radio receiver.
     
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  3. Martin Nikovski

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 16, 2015
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    Thank you for the suggestion! I forgot to mention that the whole oscillator is in a sealed housing so I don't have access to the circuit itself.
     
  4. DickCappels

    Moderator

    Aug 21, 2008
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    What else can you say about the oscillator? Manufacturer/part number...?
     
  5. alfacliff

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 13, 2013
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    if its one olf those crystal can oscilators with the frequency marked, just use an apropriate reciever to listen for the carrier. such as a 10 mhz oscilator, use a short wave reciever tuned around 10 mhz to listen for it.
     
  6. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Is this a homework question/project?
     
  7. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
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    The metal can oscillators that fit a regular 0.3" IC socket, sometimes have an enable pin.

    The datasheet and carful look at the part number may be the only solution.
     
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