Oscillating Lamp

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by DsHs, Jan 21, 2016.

  1. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    Hi,

    First of all, thanks for taking me in. I'm new to this forum.
    I have a Masters in Electrical and Computer Engineering, but I've been working on software for more than a year, so I'm a little rusty.

    Now, I'm starting a project for a gift. I have a nice lamp that I'll turn into a Tardis (did I mention I work with wood as a hobby?).
    I'd like to make the lamp turn on and off in an oscillating manner. So, the function of luminosity (or power) would look like an increasing sinusoid when turning on, hitting and stabilizing at a top cap. The reverse would be true when turning off. I can draw something if it turns out I did not make myself clear.
    Actually, I had the idea a couple of hours ago and the little search I made lead to some information on blinking/oscillating lamps, but I'd prefer to avoid buying an Arduino for this.

    Considering this is a 230V lamp, are there any circuit schematics around? I have some from my school days, but they are for 10~12V. I have a soldering iron and a dubious multimeter. Aside from that, I don't have a lab to test stuff now, so there's not a lot of room for trial and error.
    I expect such a specific thing to not just be lying around, so I'd settle for a lamp oscillator and then go on from there.

    Any ideas where I should turn to? Thanks in advance.
     
  2. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
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    Draw something. What is a "top cap"?
     
  3. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
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    @DsHs
    How many watts is your light? Type of bulb?
     
  4. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    I must tell you. I was not expecting answers so soon. I'll give more details once I get back home. I'll need a scanner for this :). Plus, I'm not sure about the bulb details. It's a white bulb, but I can't give you more than that right now.
     
  5. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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  6. Picbuster

    Member

    Dec 2, 2013
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    The number to build and max price will guide you to the best components.
    Is a gift so we need a 100K units to build price below the 7$ FOB without housing, package.
    I could be interested. Please provide all information also the countries (locale regulation an certifications).
     
  7. hp1729

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 23, 2015
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    "Like a Tardis"? You mean fade in and out at about once per second?
    If so then what he needs is a sine wave at 230 V.
    Is a lower voltage like an LED acceptable? Just a light inside the Tardis blinking?
     
  8. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    @mcgyvr: I'll need to check your link in more detail later, but at first glance seems relevant.

    @hp1729: Exactly. Not quite sure about the frequency, but essentianly that's it. LED is acceptable, but the primary function is to serve as a lamp (I'm gonna have to see if that's possible using just the Tardis' small windows. If not, I'll make a door that can be opened.).
    By the way, it's not just a sine wave. I want it to stay turned on after a few fade ins and outs. I have a graphic in mind, but I can't scan it right now.

    By the way, thanks everyone so far for your inputs.

    @Picbuster: I'm sure there are copyright restrictions. Thanks for the enthusiasm.
     
  9. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    This is more or less the behaviour I want from the LED / lightbulb:

    [​IMG]
    (This is luminosity over time.)

    What I meant by "top cap" is the maximum luminosity the bulb/LED can output.
     
  10. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
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    OK
    Have you ever bread boarded a circuit before? To fulfill your specs will require a good bit of assembly. This would be a good learning experience but you would have to encounter some costs for development. An improvised power supply, a variety of resistor and capacitor values, wire and, a "proto-board" to say the least. You would have to build and test individual functional blocks built from timers and op-amps. There is a lot of satisfaction in projects like this, but there is also a lot of work. Every electronic tech has gone through this. You start with a tool box and plastic parts organizer boxes. Are you up for it??
     
  11. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    He better have with a Masters EE/CE...

    I'd use a micro.. That type of pattern is dead simple to code..
     
  12. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    Sure. I have used breadboards at the university. I don't have that stuff at home. But I guess I can search for it :)

    @mcgyvr: any tutorials you can point me to?
     
  13. Lestraveled

    Well-Known Member

    May 19, 2014
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    @mcgyvr brought up a good point. Do you want to build this thing using discrete components or do you want to go the microcontroller route??
     
  14. hp1729

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 23, 2015
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    Re: copyright
    Making one for your own use is usually not a problem. Just don't mass produce them for sale.

    Re: fade then on
    Well now it just suddenly got complicated.
    Need to get specific then. Blink how fast, for how long before staying on?
     
  15. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    Re: copyright
    Yes, that's what I thought, but he was talking about 100k units... I have no use for that many :)

    Re: fade then on
    I think the period would be 2s (0,5Hz) and should stay on after 8s.
    If it's easy to program, would it be easy to try different functions?
     
  16. hp1729

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 23, 2015
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    Sounds like a job for an Arduino.
     
  17. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    Oh, well :D.
    I just fear I won't be able to fit an arduino into the lamp. Any smaller and simpler options? Plus, I don't know much about Arduinos, I admit, but I have seen lots of projects and it seems such a waste of potential to use it as a lamp controller.
     
  18. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    There are Arduino models that are about 3/4" X 1"; much smaller than an Uno. Plus you're going to need room for all the discrete components.

    How much room can you spare?
     
  19. DsHs

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 21, 2016
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    Ok, so, the base is 10x10cm (or a little less, like 9,5x9,5cm) which in inches is... something like 4x4"
    I think I can raise the lamp 4~5cm to put all that stuff underneath (and away from any heat from the lamp). So the total dimensions would be: ~9,5x9,5x5cm (or 4x4x2" rounded down).
     
  20. hp1729

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 23, 2015
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    Mass produced you can fit the electronics into the base of a light bulb. One single creation takes up more space.


    it would be difficult to get it all down to 6 cubic inches. Maybe you could build the electronics into the base the lamp sits on? Or power the thing with a wall wart. Putting the power supply external saves you about three cubic inches.
    How bright? A 900 lm LED is about the size of a US quarter or Korean 100 won coin. I don't know your currency. About 20 mm square and 5 mm thick. Runs on 9 to 12 Volts at about an Amp. Heat sink is suggested (about a cubic inch). A fan is good (2 cubic inches and a little noise).
    Tardis sounds? Add a couple more square inches but very possible with an Arduino or such microcontroller. BASIC Stamp?
    .
     
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