Origins of Wireless

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by MaxHeadRoom, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. MaxHeadRoom

    Thread Starter Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    A good irreverence !

    After having dug to a depth of 10 feet last year, French scientists found
    traces of copper wire dating back 200 years and came to the conclusion that
    their ancestors already had a telephone network more than 150 years ago.

    Not to be outdone by the French: in the weeks that followed, American
    archaeologists dug to a depth of 20 feet before finding traces of copper
    wire. Shortly afterwards, they published an article in the New York Times
    saying : "American archaeologists, having found traces of 250-year-old
    copper wire, have concluded that their ancestors already had an advanced
    high-tech communications network 50 years earlier than the French."

    A few weeks later, The British Archaeological Society of Northern England
    reported the following: "After digging down to a depth of 33 feet in the
    Skipton area of North Yorkshire in 2011, Charlie Hardcastle, a self-taught
    local amateur archaeologist, reported that he had found absolutely Bugger All.

    Charlie has therefore concluded that 250 years ago, Britain had already gone wireless."

    Just makes me (originally) bloody proud to be British.
     
  2. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    PROUD TO kNOW YOU AND TO KNOW ABOUT DIGGING ON THE MUDDY BANKS OF THE

    THAMES.
     
  3. paulktreg

    Distinguished Member

    Jun 2, 2008
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    Like that!

    ... and I live quite close to Skipton on the Canadian Scale (20 miles).
     
  4. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Cute joke.
    Reminds me of the one about the pig thief. Three witnesses said they saw him steal the pig. He brought in 10 people that honestly said they did not see him steal the pig. The judge considered the "weight of the evidence" and concluded the man was not guilty.
     
  5. Ian Rogers

    Member

    Dec 12, 2012
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    Excellent.. Yorkshire!!!

    Loosewire less!!!
     
  6. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    The first liar never has a chance.
     
    absf and #12 like this.
  7. MaxHeadRoom

    Thread Starter Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Some make a living at it still, you never know what you may find!
    Max.
     
  8. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    Some do not know there history....or drink

    too much of there logo.
     
  9. studiot

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 9, 2007
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    What was that about drink?

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    Max ,knows more about the Thames ,than some others.....if you don't understand

    ask......don't shoot the messenger. Sit at the pub and listen ,you may hear about

    lost objects. Hear..Hear... Cheers.
     
  11. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    Sparky ,bring us up to date about your copper history ,and what ever.
     
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  12. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Er, sure. :D

    Life is interesting, uni is uni, and the bagpipes are still being blown.

    Starting a company and doing some research on plasma antennas.

    That history good? :)

    What about your history - I see there still only the ocean picture.
     
  13. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    What's a plasma antenna?
     
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  14. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    The coolest thing ever. :D

    You energise a low pressure gas to form plasma (this can be done with HV DC, AC, or even with high power RF coupling). Then your RF signal is capacitively or inductively coupled to the plasma.

    Behaves just like a metal antenna, except for some really amazing properties. Obvious one is that when you switch the plasma off, it becomes electrically invisible. Other benefits include being able to change the resonant frequency during use (electrically controlling the plasma column, rather than physically cutting a metal antenna), frequency specific windowing, so you can chose frequencies to pass straight through the antenna.

    Really cool combination of engineering and physics. They are still relatively unexplored, which makes doing physics quite challenging in a uni with no physics department. :-(
     
  15. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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    Yeah, sounds cool alright. Too bad every user usually is permitted to operate on a very narrow band of the RF spectrum.

    But I'm sure people will find realistic uses for this kind of technology.
     
  16. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Faraday cages can solve the problem of radiating outside your assigned frequency. I worked in one that occluded radiation from a (several hundred) watt transmitter in a Mil-spec environment. Very secret stuff, undetectable from 20 feet away.
     
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  17. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Here's a video of one example -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hu97bwm-OGU

    I'll promise to take a picture of the set up once complete. Has some real fundamental differences to the type above, which should make it interesting.
     
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