Opto-22 (not the company) Standard

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by TheLaidBackGuy, Nov 10, 2009.

  1. TheLaidBackGuy

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 10, 2009
    2
    0
    Hello,

    I am trying to find information on the I/O Opto-22 standard but my searches mostly come up with information about the company named Opto-22, not the industry standard.

    When I search for "opto-22 compatible" I get links to a bunch of I/O boards that say they are opto-22 compatible, but give no other information on what that means. That is the information I am looking for.

    Does anyone know where I can find this information, or can you just explain it? All I can tell from the hardware manuals of various I/O boards is that every data pin seems to have a corresponding ground pin.

    If this isn't the right place to ask can anyone point me in the right direction?

    Thank you
     
  2. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
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  3. Opto22

    New Member

    Nov 11, 2009
    1
    0
    Hi there,

    It looks like you are missing something here, the Opto22 standard is the Opto22 "The company's standard". There is nothing more to that. Opto 22 manufactures varieties of I/Os, control systems, SSR, and more. You probably have one of their products.



    Moderator's note: shameless self promoting is still advertising










    I am trying to find information on the I/O Opto-22 standard but my searches mostly come up with information about the company named Opto-22, not the industry standard.

    When I search for "opto-22 compatible" I get links to a bunch of I/O boards that say they are opto-22 compatible, but give no other information on what that means. That is the information I am looking for.

    Does anyone know where I can find this information, or can you just explain it? All I can tell from the hardware manuals of various I/O boards is that every data pin seems to have a corresponding ground pin.

    If this isn't the right place to ask can anyone point me in the right direction?

    Thank you[/QUOTE]
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 11, 2009
  4. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
    2,675
    234
    Opto22 is a Brand Name, Crouzet & Gordos makes opto22 compatible IO modules.

    Most modules are basically opto isolators or use a type of opto coupler in their modules...

    In order to turn on an input, you have to have a ground and a positive input into each module, normally in DC modules, 1 leg of the input will be tied to either ground or Vcc depending on input requirements (i.e. active low, active high). There are a variety of "OPTO22" compatible I/O modules out there, for a variety of uses, ranging in input voltages of 3 to 32 volts DC, and color coding is a big thing also, RED Modules are DC output modules, Whites are DC Inputs, Yellow are AC inputs, Black are AC outputs...... I use these in my line of work everyday, I have actually developed my own line of OPTO22 compatible IO modules....


    What exactly do you want to know about these devices??


    My .02
     
  5. TomEdwards

    New Member

    Nov 12, 2009
    1
    0
    Okay, Opto 22 is not as recognizeable as Xerox or Kleenex, but it is a De Facto standard. The question refers to the pin assignments of the 50-pin connector that mates a digital mounting rack to the cable from a PC or motion controller. It is designed to control up to 24 digital inputs and outputs, arranged in any order. Any channel can be an input or an output.

    All the even numbered pins are logic ground.
    Pin 49 is reserved for 5 VDC power going from the mounting rack to a 'brain' which would connected to the mounting rack. It supplies power.
    Starting with pin 47 and going down by 2s, the control lines start with the first channel on the rack (we call it channel 0) and go up!

    Logic is 'low true', meaning that the control is 5 Volts when the channel is off, and it is grounded when the channel is on.

    Tom Edwards
    Sr. Tech Advisor
    Opto 22
     
  6. TheLaidBackGuy

    Thread Starter New Member

    Nov 10, 2009
    2
    0
    That is exactly what I wanted to know Tom, thank you
     
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