op-amp supply question...

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by WAN24, Jan 9, 2008.

  1. WAN24

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 27, 2006
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    this is a simple question, but im not sure...can two op-amps share a single supply? :confused:

    tnx..
     
  2. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
    5,072
    6
    Yes. The number of op-amps which can share a single supply is only limited by the current the supply can source.
     
  3. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
    282
    Yes, it's done all the time.
     
  4. WAN24

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 27, 2006
    21
    0
    tnx for the reply sir..
    if im gonna use 3 to 4 op-amps.. what current rating of the transformer should i use? coz im trying to make a power supply for those op-amps... again. tnx..
     
  5. beenthere

    Retired Moderator

    Apr 20, 2004
    15,815
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    The op amp spec sheet will tell you the current each can be expected to use. If your supply can source 100 milliamps on both supply rails, then it should be adequate. It's always a good idea to check the requirement of the op amps, though.
     
  6. WAN24

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 27, 2006
    21
    0
    ok... tnx sir!!! now i know...
     
  7. Distort10n

    Active Member

    Dec 25, 2006
    429
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    The next question would be, do you bypass ALL pins? :cool:
     
  8. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    What knightofsolamnus is referring to is the practice of connecting small capacitors (usually 0.1uF) from the op amps' supply pins to the ground pins. If you are using single-supply (only V+ and ground) op amps, connect a single 0.1uF capacitor from the V+ pin to the ground pin.

    You will need more than just a transformer; you will need a regulated power supply. If you don't have one, you could build one from a left-over computer power supply.
     
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