Online math resources

Discussion in 'Math' started by bertus, Nov 22, 2010.

  1. bertus

    Thread Starter Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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    Hello,

    On the internet there are a lot of good websites with math resources.
    Here are a couple of examples:
    http://mathworld.wolfram.com/
    http://www.sosmath.com/
    http://math2.org/

    In the belgian website of the EDUCYPEDIA there are also some linkpages:
    Algebra
    Arithmetic
    Complex numbers
    Differentials
    Fourier
    Fractals
    General overview
    Geometry
    Geometry 3D
    Integrals
    Java applications
    Loagaritm-exponential
    Matrices-determinants
    Miscellaneous topics
    Sequences & series
    Statistics
    Trigonometry


    Hope this will give you a headstart with the math problems.

    Bertus
     
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2012
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  2. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
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  3. someonesdad

    Senior Member

    Jul 7, 2009
    1,585
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    Another math resource, if you have access to it, is to search through Google books. There are many math and technical references there; many from about 1925 or before can be downloaded in full as PDF files.
     
  4. bertus

    Thread Starter Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,647
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    Hello,

    @Georacer,
    There is already a searchbar for it in the first link I gave.
    Take a look at the right side menu.

    @someonesdad,
    Old books can be interesting for research.
    Most of the techniques are quite old and still valid.
    The internet pages will probably give a faster result.

    Bertus
     
  5. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
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    @ Bertus

    I saw it but I feel some of the enquirers on the forum need an extra bright neon arrow to point them in the right direction. As I wrote, I re-mentioned it just for emphasis.
     
  6. Black-Bird

    New Member

    Jan 26, 2011
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  7. amilton542

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    www.mathtutor.ac.uk is the best online resource for mathematics, all material is also backed up with a crystal clear video tuition
     
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  8. inkyvoyd

    New Member

    Dec 6, 2011
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    Less of a place to get information and more of a place to ask questions and get (professional) responses is http://math.stackexchange.com/ . As always, they won't do your homework; these people discuss concepts.

    Just thought I'd put that out there becaues math.stackexchange is a truly wonderful community.
     
  9. Cizwik

    New Member

    Jan 28, 2014
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    thank you recources!
     
  10. Jacksion

    New Member

    Apr 22, 2014
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    For people facing problems in deciding which math programs to use, you can see the comparison between various math practice programs on this website:

    http://mathcompare.blogspot.in/
     
  11. bertus

    Thread Starter Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
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  12. panic mode

    Senior Member

    Oct 10, 2011
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    full likes this.
  13. amilton542

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
    494
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    Good hit panic mode.

    I know of a free online elementary calculus book by Keisler.

    http://www.math.wisc.edu/~keisler/

    It's really good. So good in fact it's out of print. You can't even buy it anymore, which is a shame. His treatment on vector calculus methods is described in such a way anybody could learn it. It's that good.
     
  14. bzznxlad

    New Member

    Dec 29, 2014
    10
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    I have also something useful in mathematics. There are plenty of examples about function derivatives, indefinite integrals, definite integrals, differential equations and Laplace transformations.
    http://www.mbstudent.com/maths-examples.html
    Examples are solved step by step without any lines of equations which were computed inside genius's mind; therefore; I think that those examples are very valuable when someone wants to understand something.
     
  15. vhenuscam

    New Member

    Mar 9, 2016
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    great help! thanks!
     
  16. recklessrog

    Member

    May 23, 2013
    338
    102
    If, like me, when working on a project , the old brain cells need a stir and you need a quick reference to solve something in a very practical way, one of my first actions is to look up the subject in "Practical Electronics Calculations and Formulae" by F. A Wilson. It was published by Bernard Babini, BP53. ISBN 0-900162-70-8.
    It may be out of print but I have seen it s/h on amazon. I have two copies, one in the workshop, and one on the bookshelf. I have found it to be very well written without in-depth maths's, but sufficient to get to the point and find the right method for solving most of my problems. It also has many very useful tables ready to use. I bought my first one way back in 1979 and have used it hundreds of times.
    Whether you are a university lecturer or a novice, this is definitely a book to own.
    The companion book, which follows on, is "Further Practical calculations And formulae" by the same author and publisher BP144.
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2016
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