one function generator but i want two signals

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ninjaman, Sep 2, 2016.

  1. ninjaman

    Thread Starter Member

    May 18, 2013
    306
    1
    hello,

    I have one function generator, i want to get two signals. i thought that making some kind of basic circuit i could get two signals. is there some way of doing this or do i have to get another function generator.

    thanks
    simon
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
    10,178
    1,799
    It depends on the properties of the two signals. Can you be more specific?
     
  3. ninjaman

    Thread Starter Member

    May 18, 2013
    306
    1
    just two sine waves really. nothing special.
    this video by w2aew shows the stuff i want to do.
     
  4. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
    2,504
    380
    hi,
    This simple circuit will give a phase shift for sine waves for say Lissajous traces.
    Tweak the values of C1 for different frequencies.
    E
     
  5. OBW0549

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 2, 2015
    1,328
    890
    If all you want to do is play with Lissajous figures on your scope, just use the power line (through a stepdown transformer, of course) as the second sine wave.
     
  6. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,649
    2,348
    Hello,

    The shown figure has a certain phase shift between the two sine wave signals:
    Lissajous_phase.jpg

    lissaj.gif

    Bertus
     
    absf likes this.
  7. BR-549

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 22, 2013
    2,007
    395
    You can use various gates , counters and flipflops to divide your signal generator into many frequencies. Low pass filters can smooth the squares. But one can never have enough generators.

    The x-y vector mode is a great un-used tool, both for work and instruction. You will not regret studying this.
    After getting familiar with the patterns, I highly recommend building an octopus.



    Search google---oscilloscope octopus--- for many examples.

    You can watch and adjust the phase angle in circuits, by watching the vectors. One can easily judge the quality of in circuit components (un-powered). You can easily see the gates, or should I say junctions of solid state devices. One can quickly evaluate the Q of a coil or cap.

    They should use this when teaching vectors. It shows rotation.
     
  8. ian field

    Distinguished Member

    Oct 27, 2012
    4,415
    784
    Looks like all you need is a variable phase shifter, and maybe some amplification to cover losses.

    I was wondering if Google is broken again.................
     
  9. dannyf

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2015
    1,835
    367
    fairly easy.
     
  10. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,056
    3,245
    Here's an interesting circuit for generating phase shifts.
    It's an All-Pass filter which can generate phase shifts over a near 180° variation with no change in output amplitude for either adjusting the phase or changing the frequency.
    At high frequencies, well above the corner frequency where the capacitor looks like a short, the phase shift is near 0° (the circuit looks like a follower).
    At low frequencies, well below the corner frequency where the capacitor looks like an open, the phase shift is near 180° (the circuit looks like a gain of one inverter).

    upload_2016-9-2_17-20-30.png
     
    OBW0549 likes this.
  11. SLK001

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 29, 2011
    825
    229
    That reminds me... I have $1 but I want $2.
     
  12. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,399
    497
    bleach it and print 2 on it
     
Loading...