Old books at the Gutenberg Project.

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by bertus, Jul 10, 2010.

  1. bertus

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  2. hondabones

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    Great links! Thanks for the post.

    I would like to see them have more operating manuals and such. They are so hard to find.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2010
  3. retched

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    Is there a version for girls? ;)
     
  4. JoeJester

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    Not with that date of publication. T'was another time with different attitudes.
     
  5. someonesdad

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    Definitely check out Gutenberg if you've not been there before. But I think a better resource is Google books. There's an incredible wealth of published literature there at your fingertips. For example, click on "Full view only" and "Books", then e.g. search for books with "electrical" in the title. I recommend you limit your search to a particular decade -- say, start off with 1910-1920 or somesuch; otherwise, you'll get a lot of hits.

    At the very least, track down some of the stuff written by Steinmetz and learn a few things from the master -- as William Stephenson ("Intrepid") did between the World Wars.

    Also check out "An Introduction to Physical Measurement" by Kohlrausch -- another great book.

    Once you find all this stuff, you'll probably do what I did -- my ebooks directory on my computer contains 4 GB of stuff... :p

    I nod my head in gratitude to Google for digitizing this stuff and making it available to the public.

    Oh, and you'll probably spend many hours reading the old copies of Popular Science, Popular Mechanics, etc. Since I'm an amateur machinist, I've found lots of useful tidbits in these old magazines. A lot of the electrical stuff isn't as useful, as it often involves "valves" (a term I like much better than the ho-hum US term of vacuum tubes). But there's still lots of stuff to learn. For example, I get a kick out of seeing a press release for a new Starrett tool that I have that was published in e.g. 1900 -- so it's been in production for a few years.
     
  6. bertus

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  7. hondabones

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    Hello Bertus,

    I'm not looking for any particular manual at this time. I have, however, have had to Google a few things and finding the manuals is very difficult. Finding the circuit schematic can be even harder. Thank You kindly for the links, I will surely use them for future reference.

    hondabones
     
  8. count_volta

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    I love that website. I listened to some of their audiobooks novels. They have electronics books? Runs to website!!!
     
  9. JoeJester

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    for free audio books visit http://librivox.org/

    I didn't see any electronic subjects at my first glance.
     
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