Oklahoma Joe's

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Brownout, Jun 16, 2014.

  1. Brownout

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    The bottom of my Webber grill finally fell out from rust. So, I'm looking for a new grill to put on my back deck. We went shopping yesterday, and most of what we saw was thin metal units that won't last very long. Except for Oklahoma Joe's grill/smoker combination. See it here:

    http://www.charbroil.com/offset-smoker-ok-joe-s-14201884.html

    It looks like a nice unit, and is made form heavy gauge steel. The weight is around 300lbs. So, I think it will give long service, despite some of the quality manufacturing issues.

    So, anyone have one of these? Does anyone use the side firebox/smoker feature (on this or another unit)? Any hints for smoking? I've only ever grilled before.
     
  2. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    When you do your first burn in ... look for all the smoke leaks.

    I was at a shipmate's house in Sallisaw, OK a couple of weeks ago and he told me what I had never seen on any of the modification videos at you tube. He was thinking of putting down a bead of high temperature RTV ... lay cellophane on top of the TRV and close the lids. This would form a very nice gasket and allow the RTV to cure and stick better on that one side. Remove the cellophane and do another burn in to inspect. I have to do that with my "cheaper" side box smoker. I do have two thermometers at grill height on both sides of the smoke box. I had to do a different modification to get them both to be within a reasonable agreement.

    There are other modifications at https://www.google.com/#q=%2B%22oklahoma+joe%22+%2B%22modifications%22

    As far as smoking go, I for meats I use a dry rub of some basic seasoning. For fish I use a basic brine.

    Meats get "smoked" for little over an hour and then wrapped in aluminum foil. Wings get smoked the whole time at about 350 - 400 degrees. Fish I wrap in aluminum foil to retain some moisture. I love smoking salmon ... and using the leftover for sandwiches later. The best salmon sandwich we came up with was toast with one slice having melted sharp cheese ... the strongest you can find. Sun-dried tomatoes in olive oil. Sliced salmon. We bought some sharp cheese once that we didn't like in any recipe, until that one.

    Keep the temp between 225 and 275. I'm sure there are plenty of recipes you can try from the web.

    Use a meat thermometer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2014
  3. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    You cook with the lid on?

    What for?
     
  4. wmodavis

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 23, 2010
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    Sparky49 likes this.
  5. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
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    Ah gotcha.
     
  6. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Tried smoking a turkey drumstick once. But couldn't keep the d@@m thing lit. My middle son makes his own charcoal for grilling, apple oak and hickory wood mostly.
     
  7. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    I tried smoking fish once...but my Zippo ran out of fuel and the paper did roll correctly and was too wet. j/k
     
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  8. JohnInTX

    Moderator

    Jun 26, 2012
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    Good link, thanks. Meathead at Amazing Ribs does as well. On his site is a lively discussion about the 'stall' in temp rise a brisket when smoking it - resolved by an MIT physicist who also likes smoking meat (its evaporative cooling - not collagen denaturing).

    Not a fan of his dry rub but use various others. Looking forward to firing up the old New Braunfels side-draft smoker again soon. I use the 'Texas Crutch' and rest it in an insulated chest for 2-3 hours after smoking for brisket that will melt in your mouth. I also have a small pan of water at the firebox entry to the smoke box to humidify the heat and make it stick to the meat.

    For gaskets, try heavy duty Al. foil, several layers folded over the edges of the fire and smoke boxes to make a crush gasket. Works well. Look for heavy gauge metal throughout.

    I also love my Weber kettle but you have to keep it covered and the ashes removed or else any rain will make a corrosive mud that will cause rust.

    Me. But Charbroil bought New Braunfels some years back. They make some heavy duty stuff but also some thin metal junk for mass market places (hard to tell from the pic - what gauge is heavy gauge to them?). Lots of purists don't like the side draft units because the temp near the firebox is different than the temp near the stack. I have one and put the meat in the middle - no complaints. I also put a probe in the meat and 2 thermocouple probes mounted in a wine cork about 1" above the grates (where the temp matters). I find that with the Al. foil gaskets controlling the airflow, the temp is just right across the meat.

    I'll measure my metal and let you know. EDIT its 11ga (.110" thick) all round. According to the reviews on the WalMart site, the metal is 2.5mm (about 12 ga - plenty thick). Many good reviews as well. One issue may be that its made in China. It may be just fine or loaded with lead paint, grill coating etc. Since its made for big WalMart, I would expect they have settled all that and its OK.

    Mmmm.... meat!
     
    Last edited: Jun 16, 2014
  9. Kermit2

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    Feb 5, 2010
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  10. Brownout

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I used one of those when I was in Florida, and it rusted out within a year.
     
  11. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Proper maintenance is far more of an issue than materials.. IMO..
    I've had a "cheap" Brinkmann grill that I got at Target.. Its going on 8+ years old without a single spot of rust or anything..
    BUT I cover it and maintain/clean it properly.
     
  12. Kermit2

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 5, 2010
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    Ash will create an acidic residue when moisture is present. This rapidly attacks steel and creates rust .

    Florida and here in Houston where I live, this is ever present. Dump the ash immediately after the fire is out and clean the interior surface. I use a rag and some mineral spirit made for cleaning paint brushes. 3 years and no rust yet.

    Good luck and my wishes for you finding a good deal on whatever brand you settle on.
     
  13. Brownout

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    Never had to do much maintenance before. My old, heavy cast grill lasted well over 20 years and all I ever did was empty the ash and hit it with a stiff wire brush. I'd probably sill have it if I didn't have to sell it when I moved.

    The Webber lasted 15 years, but the legs rusted off. For the last 5 years, I've had it propped up on some bricks. I just got tired of looking at it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 17, 2014
  14. Brownout

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    Since we're leaving town for a 4-5 month contract job, we're putting this on hold for now. We'll get by on our sall gas grill until we decide further.
     
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