ohm's law for linear and nonlinear circuit

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by montzar, Dec 10, 2014.

  1. montzar

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 10, 2014
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    I have a question why we draw the current on the y-axsis and the voltage on x-axsis and what is the benefit of ohms law for linear and nonlinear circuit experiment please..
     
  2. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    We don't always do that, and it is the same for both.
     
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  3. montzar

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 10, 2014
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    Do you now why? I need answer to write that in my report
     
  4. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    We draw current and voltage on a graph when we want to see a visual representation of the current versus voltage in a circuit. If the circuit is linear the plot is a straight line. Otherwise it's a non-linear circuit.

    There is no "benefit" for Ohm's law. It is simply the relationship between voltage and current in a resistive circuit.
     
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  5. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    To elaborate on my previous answer. Ohms law works for all kinds of circuits. It works for linear circuits and it works for non-linear circuits. It works for DC circuits and it works for AC circuits.
     
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  6. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    Typically a Cartesian graph uses the X axis for the independent variable (the one you can change at will) and the Y axis for the dependent variable (the one that is a function of the other). That is the convention.

    It is oft the case that following that convention will result in a graph that displays some information in a useful fashion.

    That is all it is.

    The same convention is followed when either variable may be the driving force. For example, you may control the voltage across a diode to read the current, or drive the current and read the voltage. Either way works, but by convention voltage is shown on X, current on Y.

    Also, Ohm’s Law is an empirical approximation over a limited span. For example, if I put 100 volts across a 1 ohm ½ watt resistor Ohm’s law predicts I get a constant 100 amps of current.

    In reality I get a brief current followed by a bang and some smoke. Don’t try this at home!
     
  7. Papabravo

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    Feb 24, 2006
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    Everybody knows that devices stop working when you let the magic smoke out.
     
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