Obscure Parts Identification Challenge

Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by iONic, Sep 15, 2008.

  1. iONic

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 16, 2007
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    I am at a loss with respect to a few components. Can't seem to find the datasheets for them.

    The following components came from a multiplex board off an old HeathKit Reciever/Amp.

    Motorola 442-14 7727 14 Pin DIP
    RCA 417-123 234 10 lead metal can part
    Fairchild 442-20 7231 6 lead metal can part


    Also two other components:
    They are Metal can transistor like parts..
    417-240 7219A 4 lead labeled on board as S, D, G1, & G2
    417-167 7218A 4 lead labeled on board as S, D, G, C

    any insight would be appreciated.
     
  2. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    You might need the Heathkit schematic for the device in question.
    What was the model of the Receiver/Amp?

    Here is a site with many Heathkit schematics/manuals:
    http://www.vintage-radio.info/heathkit/

    Wait a sec - look at this Heathkit cross-reference page:
    http://web.archive.org/web/20041205012314/www.d8apro.com/heath3.htm
    From there I found:
    YourPart: GenericPart[, AltPart1, AltPart2]; Description
    417-123: CA3012; Wide Band IF Amp (linear IC)
    417-167: UC734; JFET 30V 10mA TO-72 (N-ch)
    417-240: 40673, 40675, 3N201; Dual Gate MOS-FET20V 50mA TO72
    442-14: MC1438R; Op Amp
    442-20: uA703; Op Amp

    Now, I don't know about the accuracy of the list; it was compiled by input from many contributors. Better than nothing, I suppose.
     
  3. iONic

    Thread Starter AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 16, 2007
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    WOW!
    Never in a few thousand years did I expect to get little, if any response for these parts. Good Job Sgt.
     
  4. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
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    Most of the battle is just figuring out a decent search string to use ;)

    My Google search was "Heathkit schematics", and the 1st link I posted was the first hit.
    At the bottom of the page was a link to the cross-reference site, which no longer exists. However, I went to the "Wayback Machine", and plugged in the URL that no longer exists - and they happened to have a few years' worth of copies of the website.
     
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