Null output of op-amps to zero volts

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by DexterMccoy, Feb 27, 2014.

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  1. DexterMccoy

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 19, 2014
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    When calibrating op amps outputs, you have to use a resistor decade box to null out the output of the op amp to zero volts

    Each op amp is output .100 to .900 millivolts

    This is when there is no input signal

    When nulling the output of op amps or a circuit stage so it's zero volts potential , is this biasing?

    Or what is it called or doing to the circuit when you null it out like this?
     
  2. DexterMccoy

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    Feb 19, 2014
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    Mr Chips, I'm still having trouble with trying to make a new thread, thanks for doing this for me

    Title: low output servo amplifier causes damage?

    Can a low output voltage and low output current from a servo amplifier damage a gyro motor or servo motor? cause the motor to overheat or damage the bushing inside the motor? from having low current and low voltage applied to it?
     
  3. shteii01

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    Feb 19, 2010
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    Do you want zero volt input to produce zero volt output?
     
  4. DexterMccoy

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    Feb 19, 2014
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    Yes

    Because if you don't , it will add millivolts of gain and it's a domino effect from each stage after being added and added of millivolts
     
  5. shteii01

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    Next question: What is the application?
     
  6. DexterMccoy

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    Some of the Op amps are amplifiers
    Some of the Op amps are summing amplifiers

    The op amps do have a lot of feedback paths also , that feedback the output to other stages before
     
  7. shteii01

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    It is my understanding that if the device does not get enough voltage/current, the device simply does not perform. Which in turn mean that device does not work, and therefore does not break.
     
  8. DexterMccoy

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    Feb 19, 2014
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    yes but if the current is not outputting enough, I think the gyro or servo motor gets damaged because the brushes or motor overheats because of the low current being applied to it right?
     
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