Noob Question - Laptop Motherboard Power Jack

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Alex Nguyen, May 18, 2016.

  1. Alex Nguyen

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2016
    2
    0
    Hello AAC,

    I'm looking to fix my laptops power jack as it has burned out. This would be my first mini-project, but I do not want to attempt it if it is a loss cause. The copper piece around the burnt part is missing about a quarter of it. I'm being hopeful that it will still be repairable and looking for any help!


    68FUEcJ.jpg ni1RhZ1.jpg
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,298
    6,809
    I could make that work, but the soldering on the left picture is really miserable. You need some skills!
    Get somebody that is good at this to help you.
     
  3. Alex Nguyen

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 18, 2016
    2
    0
    Thank you, I will seek out help with this!
     
  4. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
    12,126
    3,048
    #12 has better skills than I do. I tried to replace a jack just like that one in a Compaq laptop and failed miserably. As I recall, I couldn't get the old one out because the multiple copper planes on the board sucked up all the heat I could apply. And I was worried that there were multiple layers I was probably destroying by applying more heat.

    I may have gotten there eventually if I had to but thankfully in that particular laptop, the power jack is on a small PCB assembly off the main board, and only cost something silly like $5 to replace. Barely more than the cost of the new jack. I gave up on trying a repair the second I saw that.
     
  5. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,298
    6,809
    No problem. I have heaters that range from a 35 watt soldering iron, through a Weller 140, a Weller 250, a propane powered soldering tip, to an oxy-acetylene torch. That puppy is coming off if I have to nuke it.:D

    But seriously, I would crumble the old connector and take out one leg at a time. Then I would bridge the damaged section of copper trace with strands of #30 wire in order to make a matrix of solder and copper like applying resin to fiberglass mat.

    In the left photo, it seems the part has been replaced, but the soldering job is really weak.
     
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