Nodal analysis problem

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by Shorouq Aly, May 26, 2016.

  1. Shorouq Aly

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 26, 2016
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    upload_2016-5-26_22-37-16.png

    Can anyone solve it,please?
     
  2. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    How much?
     
  3. watersnick

    New Member

    May 26, 2016
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    haha what a pain in the ass problem
     
  4. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    MOD NOTE: Moved to Homework Help.
     
  5. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    So, you just want someone to solve your homework for you?

    Not going to happen (hopefully).

    YOU need to show YOUR best attempt to solve YOUR homework. That gives the rest of us a starting point to help you identify your mistakes and move towards a solution in a way that you actually learn something, as opposed to just taking credit for someone else's work and then getting creamed on the exam because you don't know how to do it yourself.
     
  6. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    What's the pain? It's a very straightforward problem that takes less than ten minutes to solve (with practice, it should probably take about twice that when starting out).
     
  7. Shorouq Aly

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 26, 2016
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    it's not my homework .. why the hell would i post "my homework" for people to solve LOL .. i have an exam in that shitty subject "which is not related AT ALL to my major" and trying BY MYSELF to solve previous years' exams so PLEASE stop trying to be a smartass.. you wanna help fine .. you don't wanna help then whatever dude
     
  8. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    We see people asking for someone to do their homework for them all the time -- even willing to pay money for people to do it.

    As I said before: YOU need to show YOUR best attempt to solve YOUR homework. That gives the rest of us a starting point to help you identify your mistakes and move towards a solution in a way that you actually learn something, as opposed to just taking credit for someone else's work and then getting creamed on the exam because you don't know how to do it yourself.

    Notice how this applies directly to your claimed situation -- it's YOUR practice exam and even though the issue of claiming credit for someone else's work is off the table, you getting creamed on the exam because you didn't learn anything still is.

    If you want to show your best attempt to solve the problem as far as you could, then I will be more than willing to help. If you don't, then perhaps you should consider a major in which you won't have to do this at all.
     
  9. Shorouq Aly

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 26, 2016
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    hmmm consider another major "rather than the major i chose" because of one subject that i don't like .. makes perfect sense .. someone on the internet told me to consider it OMG i'm so gonna do it ... trust me you could've just said "show your attempt to get an answer" at first place instead of saying that i'm trying to take credit of someone else, would have done the trick .. you don't expect a new member to know your rules :| anyways i solved it so thx
     
  10. MrAl

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2014
    2,433
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    Hi,

    So you are saying this isnt really homework then, you are just trying to learn circuits better on your own?

    If so, do you know how to start a nodal analysis on a circuit, using algebra?
     
  11. The Electrician

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 9, 2007
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    The rules are in the very first (sticky) post in this forum: http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/t...ng-questions-in-the-homework-help-forum.3002/
     
  12. MrAl

    Well-Known Member

    Jun 17, 2014
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  13. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    Yeah, I guess it was a bit presumptuous of me to expect you to be able to actually read and comprehend the description on this forum:

    Edit_2016-05-27_1.png
    The fact that you never would post even a most basic attempt just reinforces the impression that you did just want someone to your work for you. But it sounds like you found (or paid) someone to do it for you, so I'm sure you'll do just great on the exam.
     
  14. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Studying past exams in an effort to see what is on future exams is course research. All work related to a course your are taking fits the definition of "home work", you know, work that is typically done outside of the class lectures and labs.

    The question states you need to use node analysis to solve this problem. If you need to brush up on nodal analysis, visit this website's ebooks on the topic of Nodal Analysis. If you want to review the other network analysis, the topic is here.

    If you want just an answer, I'm sure there are "pay per question" websites out there.
     
  15. RBR1317

    Active Member

    Nov 13, 2010
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    It is fortunate that you were able to solve the problem; however, would your rules of etiquette advise that the solution be posted here, even if only the numerical result, for proper closure? As an alternative I have looked at a similar if more daunting problem with multiple super-nodes as follows:
    SuperNode_ABC.png
    Preparing this circuit for nodal analysis to obtain the voltage across the middle resistor requires identifying the super-nodes (noted by the green and blue colors) and marking the voltage offsets within each super-node. While it is somewhat arbitrary which junction is chosen to represent the super-node and which are the offsets, it is true that this circuit has 2 super-nodes and 2 regular nodes. Since the voltage across the middle resistor is of interest, it seems natural to set one end of this resistor as the ground node even though any junction in the circuit could have been designated as ground.
    SuperNode_ABC_1.png
    When writing the node equation for a super-node one must use the voltage offsets as appropriate since not all parts of a super-node are at the same voltage. This is where marking the offsets on the circuit diagram is helpful to reduce errors. Each node equation is formed as the summation over all adjacent nodes as (node voltage - adjacent voltage)/(resistance to adjacent node). Note that each term in the node equation will begin with the present node (as shown in bold on the diagram). While I have no desire to solve this set of node equations, the Maplesoft symbolic algebra engine has no such qualms:
    Maplesoft_SuperNode.png
     
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