Nodal analysis help

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by prodisoft, Oct 17, 2015.

  1. prodisoft

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 17, 2015
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    Hi all, i am trying solve the 5.15 exercise, is for modeling and analisis of dymanic sistems, i have a dude using nodal analisis i have I1, this involves L1, Va, R1?

    p2.jpg
     
  2. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
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    So...
    What have you got so far?
     
  3. prodisoft

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    Oct 17, 2015
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    I have this but i have stuck on I1 PA170007.JPG
     
  4. shteii01

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    Feb 19, 2010
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    The voltage across inductor is:
    [​IMG]

    so Va-V1=L*dI1/dt
    I1 then is:
    I1=integral of (Va-V1)/L
     
  5. prodisoft

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 17, 2015
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    Thanks a lotfor your help, my dude now is and where i use the Resistor in the analisis?
     
  6. shteii01

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    Which one is your reference node?
     
  7. prodisoft

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    Oct 17, 2015
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    The black point under C
     
  8. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    Your equations are a hash from the get go. You need to learn to track and check your units.

    Your very first equation has "R + L" in the denominator. So you are trying to add resistance to inductance. Resistance has units of ohms, which are equivalent to "volts/amp". Inductance has units of "volt·sec/amp" which is equivalent to "Ω·s". They are incompatible and, had you checked units, you would have known that before wasting any more time on anything further.

    Similarly, in your next two equations you have current equal to voltage divided by capacitance (which yields V²/A·s, which is no where close to A) and in the last one you have voltage divided by inductance (which yields A/s).

    Most of the mistakes you make will mess up the units and, if you bother to check them, you can catch them very early. If you don't check them ....
     
  9. prodisoft

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 17, 2015
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    Yes i see it. sorry for that mistake, i used it just for indicate, you have the reason is confuse.

    In my node i have 3 currents, I1, I2, I3

    My problem is I1, i think R is part of I1, but how I involve R1 to form part of the equation for I1
    PA180009.JPG
     
  10. WBahn

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    In your equation for I1, you have (Va-V1), but that is NOT the voltage across the inductor. Va is the voltage at the top-left node relative to the bottom-left node. You need the voltage at the top-left node relative to your chosen common. You are correct in your supposition that you need to get R1 involved somehow. What is the voltage at the bottom-left node relative to your common in terms of R and I1?
     
  11. prodisoft

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    Oct 17, 2015
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    for L1 Something like this? (−I1R+Va−V1).
     
  12. WBahn

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    Yes.
     
  13. prodisoft

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    Oct 17, 2015
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    Then for I1, I have

    I1=integral of (−I1R+Va−V1)/L?
     
  14. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    I think it's L1, isn't it (which is important since you have two inductors in the circuit).
     
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