Nintendo DS Lite Circuit Board/SMD Identification HELP

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by aglanmg, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    Hi everyone,

    Just Wondering if anyone could help me identify three specific SMD Components.

    I think they are Capacitors but i am not sure.
    They are for a Nintendo DS Lite Motherboard, very close to the power switch.
    I have highlighted them in the following picture:
    [​IMG]
    http://i36.tinypic.com/21oxao4.jpg

    I could be wrong, but from top to bottom they seem to be:
    black, R38
    light brown, C108
    black, R36

    Any help would be great.

    Thank you,
    aglanmg.
     
  2. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    Typically R=resistor, C=capacitors
    The numbers (and letters really) are called reference designators. So R36 is resistor #36
    The number does not tell you its value. You will need to measure them (resistors)with a ohmeter. They must not be connected to the circuit board though for an accurate reading.
     
  3. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    The 'R' in R38 and R36 are tellers that they are resistors.

    The 'C' in C108 tells us that it is a capacitor.

    As for the values, good luck.

    You will have to find a schematic to tell you that.
     
  4. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    Thank you for the fast replies.
    Based on the info you gave me, I was able to find some interesting things online:

    R36 = 0.36Ω
    R38 = 0.38Ω

    C108 = 1 pF

    Resistors Ohms source: http://www.hobby-hour.com/electronics/3-digit-smd-resistors.php
    Capacitors Farads source: http://www.solarbotics.net/library/pieces/parts_elect_pass_cap_code.html

    Looking at the motherboard of a very old IBM computer that I have at home, I was able to find all three SMD components. Assuming the components are still working, I should be able to get the DS running again, right? Or could they have different Voltage/Wattage from the originals?

    Thanks again,
    aglanmg.
     
  5. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    They could be different.. but I wouldn't worry about it too much in this application.

    The PC motherboard components are most likely rated higher than the DS, so you should be ok.
     
  6. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    I highly doubt those resistor values are correct. Those numbers are simply the reference designator and do not imply the resistor rating. I'd bet if you look all over the circuit board you will eventually find R1, R2, R3...up to R38 and more.
    It is easy enough to simply desolder them, measure their resistance and solder them back.
     
  7. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    AHHH.. I didn't even see that!

    Almost every board out there with more than 38 resistors will have a R38.

    You will need the schematic for the DS to show you the VALUE of the resistor.

    I should have read your post closer. I thought you looked at a schematic and got the values. I didn't notice you thought R38 was .38 and such.

    However, you did do good.

    In many components the 'R' shows where the decimal point is. So 4R4 would be 4.4

    But that is when the marking is on the part itself. Markings on the PCBoard show location as a reference.

    The DS repair shops will have a sheet with the schematic that lists R1 through R9999 (or however many resistors are on the board)
    It will show the repair person what value the part is.. I.E.:

    R1 - 44OHMS
    R2 - 10kOHMS
    R3 - 330OHMS

    and so on.

    If the part was missing from the board, because it burnt off or came off because the device was dropped, etc.. The repair person could quickly get the value. You need to find someone with that list.
     
  8. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    Thanks for the reply, I checked the board and found R37 and R39 near the other resistors, but on the back of the board, which enforces what you said.

    I searched online for schematics for the Nintendo DS lite, but I couldn't find it anywhere. It seems Nintendo is very proprietary with their electronics. I even tried asking for help in their forums only to get my post deleted in a few hours.

    A friend of mine offered to open his working DS lite and measure the Ohms on the resistors for me, but unfortunately he is very busy this week.
    For the capacitor, I will need to buy the tools to verify the value.

    I will keep this thread updated with my progress.

    If anyone reading this topic has the values or the schematics, please post them here.

    Once again, thank you all for your replies,
    aglanmg.
     
  9. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Unfortunately, your friend will have to remove the components to measure the capacitance and resistance. If you leave them in-circuit, you will read the value of all the traces and components connected to it also.

    See if your friend can read any label or printing on his components.

    There is often a number on the components (not the PCB) that will identify there value.
     
  10. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    I didn't know it was necessary to remove the components to measure them. Thanks for the info. I will ask my friend if he can read what is written on the components. But from pictures I've seen online, it seems that only the resistors have something written on them. :(
     
  11. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
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    Capacitors normally don't have anything written on them. Resistors often have a 3 digit number, the first 2 are the first 2 digits of the number and the third is the number of zeros to put on the end.
    eg
    101 is 100 ohms
    514 is 510000 ohms
     
  12. bassplayer142

    Active Member

    Jan 2, 2007
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    I haven't worked any with surface mount but, keep in mind that if the capacitor is polarized then when you solder it back on it should be in the same orientation as when you took it off. Don't solder it on backwards!
     
  13. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    Thank you for the advice, but I am pretty sure polarized capacitors are labeled CPx rather than Cx. In my case, C108.
    If anyone disagrees, let me know.

    BTW, I put the picture of the back and the front of the circuit board side by side: http://i33.tinypic.com/5y9854.jpg

    I am putting a link rather than the actual picture because the image is too big and would distort the thread.
     
  14. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    Although we do not know the exact values we can make some educated guesses as to what they might be, or what might work.

    R36: This is connected to one terminal of a switch. The other terminal is connected to what appears to be a ground plane. The second terminal of the switch (pin 2) appears to connect to a power trace; perhaps the main battery or system supply. Since that resistor appears way too small to carry the current for the whole device, it seems more likely that it is a pull-down resistor. Often these are in the range of 1k to 10k. And the DS should work with any value between these. Nintendo would have probably specified one standard value for the whole device to reduce cost (buying more of the same component, important when it's a competitive market) but it *should* work with any sensible value.

    R38: This is very similar to R36, as it goes from ground to a gold contact, the gold contact presumably forming some kind of switch with another contact. Again 1k to 10k should do.

    C108: Appears to be a filter cap near the pull down. I would suggest 100n, though this needs closer analysis. Can you post a better picture of R38 and C108?
     
  15. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    c108 appears to be a de-coupling cap. It appears to be connected directly to a ground plane.

    I think (of all roads lead to nowhere) a 1k for R38 and a .01uF for C108 would do the trick.

    [ed]
    Actually, the contact you are speaking of tom66 is the PWSW (Power Switch) So it likely is decoupling cap and pull-down resistor.

    I would stick with 1k and .01uF.
    [/ed]
     
    Last edited: Aug 22, 2010
  16. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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  17. tom66

    Senior Member

    May 9, 2009
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    I have to say, C108 doesn't look damaged. Only R36 and R38 look damaged. But replace them all to be sure.
     
  18. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    The picture you are looking at is not of the DS I am trying to fix. It is a high resolution image I found on google.
    The components in my DS lite are not damaged. They are missing.
     
  19. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Have you thought about posting a picture of them on a milk carton?

    ;)
     
  20. aglanmg

    Thread Starter New Member

    Aug 20, 2010
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    I had not thought about that, but I will consider your suggestion...

    [​IMG]

    LOL
     
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