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Discussion in 'Electronics Resources' started by MWalden, Apr 26, 2007.

  1. MWalden

    Thread Starter Member

    Apr 26, 2007
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    I Have just recently started to read "Teach Yourself Electricity and Electronics" McGraw Hill. I have just started to read section 3 Chapter 19 "Introduction to Semiconductors." I really love electronics now and I am probably going to major in Electrical Engineering or Computer engineering. I really like the long math problems that you have to do to figure out certain values in complex circuits (complex for me anyway, a beginner). I have always liked math through High school anyway.

    After this book I plan on jumping to the NEETS modules and reading them, because they seem to cover a broad variety of subjects at over 4500 pages, and was wondering if each of these modules was considered a class by it self in the Navy?

    Are all of these module's subjects studied through the course of a bachelor's degree in EE?

    After reading all of the NEETS modules (which will take a minute), will I know enough to design my own radio circuits and other circuits on subjects covered in the modules?

    Thanks for any help,
    Michael
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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  3. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    The NEETS program is what the Navy uses to tech their begining Electronics Technicians as it starts from ground zero and takes you through alot of circuits.

    If your energetic enough you could design your own radio circuits after learning the information in the NEETS books.

    As far as your Bachelors Degree, you would have it easier than some in your class with your previous knowledge from whatever your reading ...

    Books I have on my bookshelf or in my computer include:

    Art of Electronics - Horiwitz and Hill
    Art of Electronics Student Manual
    Electronics Communication by Schrader
    A 1949 edition of RADAR
    MIT Radiation Lab Series Volume 4 - Loran
    The NEETS program on CD
    A lot of datasheets
    The Ebooks that make up the AllaboutCircuits site
    Some well thought out explainations in pdf format written by hgmjr.

    and I'm sure I've missed a few.
     
  4. thingmaker3

    Retired Moderator

    May 16, 2005
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    The NEETS modules won't help much in the way of design principles, but they're dandy for learning the basics, troubleshooting, and maintenance.
     
  5. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    If you are looking for tips on designing your own circuits, I further recommend Art of Electronic mentioned by JoeJester. Its a little old these days so probably isn't the best bet for the digital side of things, but for conceptual grasp of circuit design techniques, and tips you won't find in the 'formal' textbooks on this subject, its an essential tool in your arsenal.

    hgmjr is also correct to recommend the AAC e-book which continue to get additions throughout the course of this year.

    Dave
     
  6. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    A couple of years ago, in the sci.electronics.design NNTP group, Winfield Hill was discussing the upcoming Fourth Edition of the Art of Electronics.

    I don't know the publishing date, but I'm sure you could pick up a copy of edition three relatively cheap at http://www.half.com
     
  7. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    As far as I'm aware it's still in 2nd edition (1989).

    If there is a third edition I would be interested in upgrading my existing copy to see how they have brought it up to date.

    Dave
     
  8. JoeJester

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 26, 2005
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    Dave,

    Your right. The current is the second edition. They were talking about the third edition. I guess I shouldn't try to remember idle writings without researching them before referencing them.
     
  9. Dave

    Retired Moderator

    Nov 17, 2003
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    Thanks for the clarification JoeJester. I hope the do get round to updating it, particularly since the developments in the field of electronics (particularly the digital/computing side of it) have been significant since 1989.

    Dave
     
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