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Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rippin6, Jan 16, 2012.

  1. rippin6

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 16, 2012
    2
    0
    Hey, new member. I've been learning about electronics for a while with no clear understanding about what the components in a circuit are doing. Been working on an old Traynor pa amp, trying to figure out why there is a loud buzz coming through. I found the problem, but not before frying some components. After testing each component in the circuit, i got really frustrated in not knowing what that transistor is doing, and the other three. Along with every other component in the circuit. Long story short, is there a book, web site, or on this site that explains in detail what each component is doing in a circuit. Appreciate all the info i can get. Thanks for now.
     
  2. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    Hi rippin!:)

    Are you looking for that specific circuit?

    Or components in general?

    If you already know what each component does, look at the circuit as a puzzle. Start with the inputs, look where the current flows and try to figure it out as you go. First, this resistor and capacitor charges up and then discharges every other second, which in turn is fed to a transistor which with the next transistor amplifies the... and so on.

    However, if you are unsure, try looking for some beginners books. Electronics for Dummies, Art of Electronics, etc are some good books depending how deep you want to get into electronics.

    We do have a resources section which contains lots of books/videos/website which may help you.

    Good luck!:)

    Sparky

    EDIT: Here's the link -> http://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/forumdisplay.php?f=15
     
  3. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
    2,147
    300
    It is important to be clear about what you already know, and what you need to find out about. Studying a complicated circuit is all very well if you know how the basic components work, but if not you would do better to take a step back and make a study the components by themselves, and then in simple circuits.

    Perhaps you already know some of the more basic stuff, but find the circuits used in real-world equipment puzzling. For that sort of problem, years ago I might have recommended a book called "The Art of Electronics" by Horowitz and Hill. I suspect that it would be very out of date now, although it may have been updated - younger members may have better suggestions.

    The website for this forum contains some useful references, which you can access from the top of the page. There are of course many textbooks and other on-line resources which you could use. For instance, you could try searching the web using a word or short phrase related to the topic you need to study, like "resistor", "capacitor" "diode"... or "Ohm's Law" "potential division" "transistor biasing..." and so on.
     
  4. Sparky49

    Active Member

    Jul 16, 2011
    834
    417
    Adjuster, I agree with you. I bought Art of Electronics about 4 or 5 months ago - as you say some of it is quite outdated.

    Saying that, there is still a lot of useful stuff which still applies.

    What I would say, is make sure you are ready for some fairly intense maths and you are quite sure to stick with electronics. Art of Electronics starts off with quite a bit of maths, which seemed a little daunting for me.

    If you haven't already, consider looking at one or two of the Dummies books. They are far simpler and a fairly easy dip into the subject.

    Sparky
     
  5. rippin6

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jan 16, 2012
    2
    0
    Thank you for the advise and the quick response. I have read alot on individual component with the inability to retain the information. I'm a bit of a hard learner until i fully understand it. hands on type ( measure it, see it in action). I have built alot of little circuits from schematics, but thats all it is. not understanding why things are where they are, and what there doing. What effect is that resistor having on the circuit, or the 4 small transistors feeding the two large ones right before the output jacks. I guess I'm trying to jump on top of the mountain, because walking up isn't working. I think if I get the big picture, the little one will be easier. Wow, reading this over seems like i need direction. I'll check out the link and the books. Thanks for now.
     
  6. lloger

    New Member

    Nov 27, 2011
    4
    0
    Thank you for your suggestion. I will learn until I fully understand it.:)
     
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