Neutral and Phase

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by coneofsilence, Dec 24, 2014.

how does electron come from neutral?

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  1. coneofsilence

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    hello i'm newbie here :)

    as i known, neutral has zero charge of electron. then how does with 220v AC?
    in half of second, current flows from the neutral and go flowing to the L1/L2/L3, so how can electron come and flow?
     
  2. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
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    hi,
    You are confusing 'Neutron', which has no charge with Neutral which is a name used to described mains wiring Line and Neutral.

    E
     
  3. coneofsilence

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    hi eric, thanks for answering.
    i'm confused about neutral used for 220v ac (line+neutral). how can neutral provides current in a half of second? (based on alternating current principle).
    i'm electrical beginner, so sorry if i'm asking stupid question. actually i'm still confused about ur answer :)
     
  4. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
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    hi,
    The Line [Phase] and Neutral are only the copper wires that form a conducting loop between the power station Alternator and the Load [ say a Kettle] in your house.
    The loop wires do not create or provide current.

    In many mains supplies the Neutral wire is also connected to Ground/Earth

    Does this help.?
    E

    EDIT:
    To keep it simple, I have omitted any mains transformers.;)
     
    Last edited: Dec 24, 2014
  5. coneofsilence

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    eh sorry, aint a half of second, it depands upon its frequency.
    hha get it eric, i'm quite undertood, thanks.

    let's see this vidio, would u mind to watch it? here's the link

    oiya, how about if i touch the neutral wire? am i getting shocked? (if the phase isnt connected)

    the theory is, AC power comes up from different pole, it's not directly one direction, isnt it? if phase to phase, current flows from L1 to L2 then from L2 to L1. it's ok, both of them have potential different. but how about neutral+L1?
    so sorry eric, i ask too much.
     
  6. ericgibbs

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jan 29, 2010
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    Hi,
    I would suggest you do not use names like L1, L2 as these terms are used for othe mains applications.
    Use, L-ine, N-eutral , E-arth
     
  7. coneofsilence

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    oke eric
     
  8. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Also think of it this way, a Neutral conductor is ANY arbitrary AC supply conductor that is taken or referenced to Earth Ground for the purpose of creating a Neutral, it does not change the characteristics of the supply itself.
    Max.
     
  9. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
    13,009
    3,233
    Perhaps your confusion is from the statement that neutral is at zero volts. Actually there is a small voltage that appears across the neutral wire to push the current through the wire resistance. Thus, if you measure the neutral voltage to earth ground when it is carrying current at an outlet, you will measure a small voltage as determined by the current times the wire resistance from the point that neutral is connected to ground in the electrical panel to the outlet.

    Does that help your understanding?
     
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,284
    6,797
    The word, "convention" comes into play here. It is a human agreement, a convention, to call one side of a power pair, "neutral". You could call the two wires Fred and Barney if everyone else knew that Barney was supposed to be connected to Earth ground. The fact that Barney is connected to the planet somewhere does not mean Barney can never have current flowing through him because being connected to the planet is not defined as having no current, no charge, and no conductivity. There is the point. You must divorce your beliefs about the word, "neutral" when that word is merely used as a convention.
     
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