network topology ?

Discussion in 'Computing and Networks' started by Mathematics!, Apr 2, 2011.

  1. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
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    I have setup simple star topology networks using a simple 8port linksys switch/router.

    I want to setup simple wired mesh and ring topology networks.
    I am wondering what the necessary hardware I need to do so?

    Obviously I am curious how I can have the NIC card which has only one RJ45 port be able to directly connect to all the computers ,...etc as in a mesh.

    Could I splice the cat6 wires and connect them on a 66 or 110 block?
    I am a little unsure about this maybe the only way is to buy a hub. Ofcourse none of the networking diagrams I am looking at indicate you need a hub to make a mesh.

    Any advice would be great
     
  2. AlexR

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2008
    735
    54
    Why would you want to do that?
    Ethernet is designed to run in a star topology without any routing loops. In fact many high end ethernet switches have mechanisms (spanning tree) to eliminate any loops that do happen to occur.
    If you want to run a loop topology change your network to token ring (if they still sell it which I doubt).
    Advice
    Read up on networking protocols and network topologies before you start wrecking your network.
     
  3. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
    4
    well, I was just wondering how one would create a wired mesh network with only computers. It was a matter of curiosity.

    As for the ring toplogies I was just wondering if token rings where the only type of ring topology. I know you need special MSAU hardware for token rings.
    Didn't know if their where other ring topologies which didn't require MSAU.
     
  4. AlexR

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2008
    735
    54
    Quite simply if you are running ethernet then you can't have routing loops therefore you can't run a meshed network. Having routing loops on an ethernet network is a guaranteed method of bringing the network to its knees.

    You can run a meshed network at the network layer but that needs routers, multiple networks and multi-homed hosts. By no means a simple exercise.
     
  5. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
    4
    ok , a few last questions
    Forget the wired mesh.

    Are their any other ring topologies then token rings. Or is token rings the many ring topology?

    For a bus topology is their special cabling to buy that allows me to use one cable to host multiple computers on it. (like shown in the bus topology diagrams). I am having a hard time understanding how to connect all the computers using one cable like the diagram shows... do I slice it ....
     
  6. AlexR

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 16, 2008
    735
    54
    FDDI is one ring protocol that springs to mind.

    The original 10base2 ethernet ran with the computers daisy-chained via coax cable but I doubt that you could get10base2 NICs now. In any case it was limited to 10Mbs and had the disadvantage that if there was a break in the coax cable anywhere along the chain then the entire network would go down.

    Modern network interfaces expect to be connected to a hub or a switch rather than run as a bus connection.
     
  7. Mathematics!

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Jul 21, 2008
    1,022
    4
    so do mesh , bus , and ring topologies still exist. Or is it more like all networks are created using routers , hubs , or switches and connecting these together to form larger networks?

    I never worked on creating large networks before just small SOHO or very small home/small business networks.

    Does the internet still have mesh , bus , and ring networks on it?
    Is 90% of all networks star topology which are connected together....etc
    And it seems for LAN technology it is 99% ethernet?

    I am just trying to get a break down/ percented of what LAN's and Wan's are made up of.

    Something like LAN
    90% ethernet
    5% token
    2% ATM
    ...etc
    Wan
    fiber 70%
    ...etc

    Curious if anybody has a large enough picture to classify all LAN and Wan technology.
    So I know what network hardware I would be most likely working with on huge networks and medium size networks.
     
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