neon transformer

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by ariemeir, Apr 20, 2013.

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  1. ariemeir

    ariemeir Thread Starter Member

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    Hi guys,

    So driving around on a saturday among the garage sales paid off.
    I've found a 7500 V , 30ma old school transformer:
    http://www.allstarlightbulbs.com/acatalog/Light_Bulbs_T7512W_5903.html

    I was planning to use it as a variable HV ac power supply by feeding the input
    from my bipolar 100w kepco
    (link here for completeness of description: http://www.kepcopower.com/bop.htm)


    I've been experimenting with the setup his morning and have observed a few things which i am not sure how to explain. I was hoping for some expert advice, as i am trying to understand the fundamental causes.

    My setup is 100w amplifier into the input of the transformer while i feed in the amplifier from a simple audio signal generator.

    I'm measuring the output voltage on the transformer by connecting a 500:20 MegaOhm resistor load to it and taking the readout from the bottom 20MegaOhms.

    My first question:

    As I started cranking up the gain of the amplifier, up to a certain point (50v ac at the input to the transformer),
    my transformer was drawing ~ 0.5A of current and no visibile signal was seen at the output. After this critical point, signal appeared and the current drawn dropped to milliamps. I imagine it is something similar to static friction ? you need to go beyond a certain point for things to start moving ?

    However when i tried to connect a regular 120VAC:12VAC transformer in reverse for a similar experiment, i didn't observe such a phenomena.

    Could you help figuring out - what am i seeing ? is it losses in the iron ? it kind of limits my output voltage from below, but i am ok with that as long as i can understand and predict it.


    My second question:

    I've connected my oscilloscope to the output of the amplifier (200v peak2peak). When the transformer is not connected, the signal is a beautiful 50hz sine. As soon as i connect the transformer (irregardless of the amp's gain), the sine becomes distorted - it has a high frequency oscillation region for approximately 1/8 of the cycle around one of the zero crossings.

    I intend to use this supply for some scientific experimentation so the purity of the signal might be of value, so i am trying to understand if what i am seeing is simply an artifact of my measurements, or is there something else that
    causes the distortion ?

    another 2 details :

    1. the output of the transformer shows the same distortion so i am inclined to think that it is a real distortion, but i cannot identify its source.

    2. the amp that i am using is 100w, while the transformer is rated 225Va,
    so i think that if i put a heavy load and crank the input of the transformer to its max, i might run out of steam, but the distortion happens way before that - no load at the output of the transformer, and 1/2 the input voltage, so i think it should work.


    Thank you for any advice you might have.

    Regards,
    Lenny.
     
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  2. DerStrom8

    DerStrom8 Well-Known Member

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    #2
  3. ariemeir

    ariemeir Thread Starter Member

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    Sure thing DerStorm8,
    you're right.

    L.
     
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  4. Brownout

    Brownout Well-Known Member

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    I don't think you have an old school transformer. You need to find an older iron core type like in your other thread.
     
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  5. ariemeir

    ariemeir Thread Starter Member

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    Brownout, thanks for the message.

    what makes me think that the transformer is old school is its weight and size.
    It is a rust-covered metal box that weighs close to 15 pounds and is filled with some fiber-glass looking resin.

    Also - i remembered that the new transformers are high frequency and this one is Fin = Fout - i played with the input frequency and the same frequency appears at the output.




    Lenny
     
    #5
  6. Brownout

    Brownout Well-Known Member

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    Hmmmm... this gets curiouser and curiouser. Maybe an answer will come to me in a dream tonight.
     
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  7. bertus

    bertus Administrator

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    Hello,

    As said continue in your other thread.

    Bertus
     
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