Need UK 230v machine to run on USA mains voltage

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by rsracing1, Dec 24, 2014.

  1. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    Hi.. new to forum.

    I'm installing a tool with no schematics in USA, Colorado to be exact. The system came from the UK and states below requirements.

    230VAC +/- 5% 50/60Hz, single phase (230VAC between Live (hot) and earth
    (ground), 0VAC between Neutral and earth (ground), 230VAC between live (hot)
    and neutral)), 32A fused with (with 10,000AIC rating) supply with separate ground.
    Earth fault loop impedance <0.1Ω. Isolator required within close proximity of
    operator and capable of Lock and Tagout

    How do I make this work in the USA. what do I need?

    Thanks

    Gordon
     
  2. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    First, you need to find out if their neutral is isolated from their earth ground. If true, we have 230 volts, 60Hz here. We use split phase instead of single phase. The center of the 230 VAC is grounded to the planet.

    As for the Ground Fault Isolator, that's a different matter.
     
  3. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    You should have no problem with hooking up to US 1ph 240v.
    The 240v used in UK is one phase of a star connected transformer and the star neutral.
    The grounding technique is basically the same.
    What is the nature of the equipment?
    If hard wired, you need a local disconnect.
    Max.
     
    #12 likes this.
  4. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    The equipment runs a stepper and servo motors via a controller and a HV PSU that powers an X-Ray source. that's powered with the mains power. The system is non medical and issued for XRD diffraction measurements. But don't think the application really matters here.

    I have 220v and ground ( 2 x 110v per leg) at the tool .
    Tried connections it today and didn't work.. Hence me wondering why it would not

    Thx

    Gordon


     
  5. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    Please excuse my fat fingers on my phone keyboard Makes my English / spelling look bad


     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    What is meant exactly by 'Didn't work'? No Lights? Blew a fuse?
    Was it purposely exported from UK by the manuf or supplier?
    I have practiced machine installation both sides of the pond and cannot think of an immediate reason why not?
    Max.
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Those two statements seem to contradict each other. Are we to imagine a nebulous box of, "unknown" and guess how and why it didn't work?
     
  8. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    Sorry should have been more spesific.

    It blow one of the fuses on one of the 220v LEDs at the fused isolator.

    There's a mains isolator at the tool as well. Turned on the mains s/w at tool all ok. There is a mains contractor and a few other relays ect for latching low voltage circuits etc. when I pushed the power button on the front of the tool I heard what sounded like a contactor pull in then drop out. Found 20 amp fuse in mains isolated for one leg blown and one small fuse in the tool blown.

    I'm nth inking ewhen the contactor pulls in its shorting a leg to ground. So wondering if this could be related to USA 220v ( 110v per leg ) vs 240 v single phase and neutral

    Thx

    Gordon
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    A UK machine should not have continuity from one side of the supply to ground, this would break the rule of using earth ground as a conductor.
    Did the machine come with any schematics, or other information.
    Otherwise it may need some reverse engineering of the power circuit?
    Max.
     
  10. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    Answer to your other question. I purchased the system from the UK to install in the USA think 220v USA would ok on 230/240v UK.

    Was thinking worst case I could change out some of the UK voltage control components for USA control components.. For example 230/240v PSU that steps down to 24v for control circuit..
     
  11. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Can't think of any reason you would have to do that?
    Max.
     
  12. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I see on the OP you mention no schematics, do you have a contact in the UK for the Manuf. and drop them an email and see if they can clarify anything you should be doing or aware of?
    Max.
     
  13. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    Not contradict.. Application meaning specifically what it's used for. Just don't want to complicate the Q&A with information that's not relevant. Just trying to keep it simple .

    HV PSU that supplies an X-Ray source. HV PSU is the only relevant part. The HV supply is unplugged from this circuit at the moment so is actually not part of the circuit

    Thx

    Gordon
     
  14. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    The company is out of business so unable to get schematics.

    Do you think there would be any reason why USA 220v would not work on this assuming there was nothing wrong with the tool.

    Thx

    Gordon
     
  15. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    I think my main question is my concern that USA voltage 220v being configured as 2 legs at 110v could give problems if I'm the tool spec is looking for 230/240v single phase one leg and a neutral ..
     
  16. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    There is nothing comes to mind, particularly if one side of the supply was referenced to ground, say, it would not make sense.
    If it were me, I would be doing some tracing of the wiring/components on the down stream side of the blown fuses in an effort to analyze why they should blow.
    If the equipment requires 230/240v 1ph you should not have to worry about the neutral in N.A. use.
    Max.
     
  17. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    Just pointing out the fact that the more clues we get, the better we can help you.
    You never know whether you will find somebody here that actually works on those machines!

    Another thought...220 is often a misnomer. At my house, I have 250 VAC for the actual measurement.
     
  18. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    No problem.. I apreciate all your questions. I didn't want to over complicate things by mentioning items that were not relevent as that can sometimes over complicate and send folks of on a tangent.

    The

    Gordon
     
  19. rsracing1

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 24, 2014
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    I'm from the UK living I the USA for a number of years and understand the UK voltage side of things. I've just never dealt with The USA voltage system much hence why I wondered about the USA voltage being the possible cause before digging into the control circuit to see if I have a short some where .

    Thx

    Gordon
     
  20. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    N.A. used to be 110/220 now it is pretty well universally 120/240, I know Canada is.
    I am also from the UK and living in Canada for a few decades and have also worked in the U.S.
    Off the top of my head I cannot think of anything that jumps out.
    Max.

    I am just off to a Xmas eve party so I will bring it up there.;)
    Max.:)
     
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